Gestational Diabetes: Diagnosis, Classification, and Clinical Care

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) affects approximately 6% of pregnant women, and prevalence is increasing in parallel with the obesity epidemic. Protocols for screening/diagnosing GDM are controversial with several guidelines available. Treatment of GDM results in a reduction in the incidence of preeclampsia, shoulder dystocia, and macrosomia. If diet and lifestyle changes do not result in target glucose levels, then treatment with metformin, glyburide, or insulin should begin. It is generally recommended that pregnancies complicated by GDM do not go beyond term. For women identified to have prediabetes, intensive lifestyle intervention and metformin have been shown to prevent or delay progression to type 2 diabetes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)207-217
Number of pages11
JournalObstetrics and Gynecology Clinics of North America
Volume44
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2017

Fingerprint

Gestational Diabetes
Life Style
Dystocia
Prediabetic State
Metformin
Pre-Eclampsia
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Pregnant Women
Obesity
Guidelines
Insulin
Diet
Glucose
Pregnancy
Incidence
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Classification
  • Clinical care
  • Diagnosis
  • Gestational diabetes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Gestational Diabetes : Diagnosis, Classification, and Clinical Care. / Mack, Lynn R; Tomich, Paul G.

In: Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinics of North America, Vol. 44, No. 2, 06.2017, p. 207-217.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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