Gentamicin Dosage Recommendations for Neonates Based on Half-Life Predictions from Birthweight

Christopher K. Charlton, Howard Needelman, Russel W. Thomas, Kenneth Kortas

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The appropriate dosing of gentamicin in the newborn was evaluated. Gentamicin was administered intramuscularly to 151 neonates ranging in birthweight from 0.66 to 4.7 kg (gestational age, 26-42 weeks) during a 7-month period. A dosage of 2.5 mg/kg of birthweight every 12 hours was initiated at birth until gentamicin serum levels could be determined. These infants were divided into three groups based on birthweight: 1) d 1000 gm; 2) 1001-2000 gm; 3) > 2000 gm. From gentamicin serum level data, these three groups had significantly different (P < 0.05) gentamicin half-lives. Based on the desirability of maintaining a trough gentamicin serum level < 2, 100, 95.5, and 39% of infants in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively, required initial dosing interval adjustments. A second group of 74 infants whose birthweight ranged from 0.82 to 3.9 kg (gestational age, 26-42 weeks) required aminoglycoside therapy and were prospectively placed on gentamicin 2.5 mg/kg of birthweight on the following schedule: 1) d 1000 gm every 24 hours; 2) 1001-2000 gm every 18 hours; 3) > 2000 gm every 12 hours. Using this method, only 15, 58, and 33% of infants in groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively, required dosing interval changes. We conclude that a marked reduction in undesirably high trough gentamicin serum levels can be affected by a simple change in dosing interval based on birthweight, although gentamicin serum levels are still required due to a significant number of infants with high trough levels.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)28-32
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Perinatology
Volume3
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1986

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Gentamicins
Half-Life
Newborn Infant
Serum
Gestational Age
Parturition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Gentamicin Dosage Recommendations for Neonates Based on Half-Life Predictions from Birthweight. / Charlton, Christopher K.; Needelman, Howard; Thomas, Russel W.; Kortas, Kenneth.

In: American Journal of Perinatology, Vol. 3, No. 1, 01.1986, p. 28-32.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Charlton, Christopher K. ; Needelman, Howard ; Thomas, Russel W. ; Kortas, Kenneth. / Gentamicin Dosage Recommendations for Neonates Based on Half-Life Predictions from Birthweight. In: American Journal of Perinatology. 1986 ; Vol. 3, No. 1. pp. 28-32.
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