Genetics, hereditary hearing loss, and ethics

William J. Kimberling, Ann F. Lindenmuth

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this article, some of the ethical issues arising from the applications derived from the genome project are addressed in relation to hearing loss and the deaf community. The authors present the issues as a series of questions that audiologists might pose to themselves and discuss with friends informally. Society has the obligation to find answers to these ethical questions. Audiologists, geneticists, and otolaryngologists have a unique understanding of hearing loss disorders and can act as advisors to the public and government officials. An understanding of the issues involved will help in generating a meaningful dialogue about the balance of individual rights with the needs of society.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)216-225
Number of pages10
JournalSeminars in Hearing
Volume28
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2007

Fingerprint

Hearing Loss
Ethics
Hearing Disorders
Social Responsibility
Genome
Audiologists
Government Employees
Otolaryngologists

Keywords

  • Ethical issues
  • Gene therapy
  • Genetic testing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Genetics, hereditary hearing loss, and ethics. / Kimberling, William J.; Lindenmuth, Ann F.

In: Seminars in Hearing, Vol. 28, No. 3, 01.08.2007, p. 216-225.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Kimberling, WJ & Lindenmuth, AF 2007, 'Genetics, hereditary hearing loss, and ethics', Seminars in Hearing, vol. 28, no. 3, pp. 216-225. https://doi.org/10.1055/s-2007-982903
Kimberling, William J. ; Lindenmuth, Ann F. / Genetics, hereditary hearing loss, and ethics. In: Seminars in Hearing. 2007 ; Vol. 28, No. 3. pp. 216-225.
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