Genetic analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome I

On the role of mutagen specificity in delimiting the set of genes identifiable using temperature-sensitive-lethal mutations

Steven D Harris, J. R. Pringle

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In a previous attempt to identify as many as possible of the essential genes on Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome I, temperature-sensitive (Ts-) lethal mutations that had been induced by ethyl methanesulfonate or nitrosoguanidine were analyzed. Thirty-two independently isolated mutations that mapped to chromosome I identified only three complementation groups, all of which had been known previously. In contrast, molecular analyses of segments of the chromosome have suggested the presence of numerous additional essential genes. In order to assess the degree to which problems of mutagen specificity had limited the set of genes detected using Ts- lethal mutations, we isolated a new set of such mutations after mutagenesis with UV or nitrogen mustard. Surprisingly, of 21 independently isolated mutations that mapped to chromosome I, 17 were again in the same three complementation groups as identified previously, and two of the remaining four mutations were apparently in a known gene involved in cysteine biosynthesis. Of the remaining two mutations, one was in one of the essential genes identified in the molecular analyses, and the other was too leaky to be mapped. These results suggest that only a minority of the essential genes in yeast can be identified using Ts- lethal mutations, regardless of the mutagen used, and thus emphasize the need to use multiple genetic strategies in the investigation of cellular processes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)279-285
Number of pages7
JournalGenetics
Volume127
Issue number2
StatePublished - Mar 1 1991

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Mutagens
Saccharomyces cerevisiae
Chromosomes
Mutation
Temperature
Essential Genes
Genes
Nitrosoguanidines
Ethyl Methanesulfonate
Mechlorethamine
Chromosomes, Human, Pair 17
Mutagenesis
Cysteine
Yeasts

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)

Cite this

Genetic analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome I : On the role of mutagen specificity in delimiting the set of genes identifiable using temperature-sensitive-lethal mutations. / Harris, Steven D; Pringle, J. R.

In: Genetics, Vol. 127, No. 2, 01.03.1991, p. 279-285.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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