Gene mapping of the Usher syndromes

W. Kimberling, R. J.H. Smith

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

USH is an autosomal recessive group of diseases characterized by auditory impairment and visual loss owing to RP. Two common types of USH are known, types I and II. USH type I is characterized by a congenital severe to profound hearing impairment, absent vestibular function, and a progressive pigmentary retinopathy. Persons with type I do not find hearing aids useful, have delayed motor development, and experience progressive night blindness and peripheral visual loss, which usually begins in their second decade. USH type II is characterized by a congenital moderate to severe hearing loss with a down-sloping audiogram, normal vestibular function, and a progressive pigmentary retinopathy. Persons with USH2 find hearing aids beneficial, have normal psychomotor development, and experience progressive night blindness and peripheral visual loss, which usually begins in their third decade. Vestibular dysfunction is the best distinguishing hallmark to differentiate USH type I from type II. One USH type II gene (called USH2) has been assigned to chromosome 1q. One USH type I gene has been tentatively assigned to chromosome 14q. There are other USH genes that have not yet been localized.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)923-934
Number of pages12
JournalOtolaryngologic Clinics of North America
Volume25
Issue number5
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

Fingerprint

Usher Syndromes
Chromosome Mapping
Night Blindness
Retinitis Pigmentosa
Hearing Aids
Hearing Loss
Chromosomes
Genes
Vision Disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Kimberling, W., & Smith, R. J. H. (1992). Gene mapping of the Usher syndromes. Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America, 25(5), 923-934.

Gene mapping of the Usher syndromes. / Kimberling, W.; Smith, R. J.H.

In: Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America, Vol. 25, No. 5, 01.01.1992, p. 923-934.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kimberling, W & Smith, RJH 1992, 'Gene mapping of the Usher syndromes', Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America, vol. 25, no. 5, pp. 923-934.
Kimberling W, Smith RJH. Gene mapping of the Usher syndromes. Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America. 1992 Jan 1;25(5):923-934.
Kimberling, W. ; Smith, R. J.H. / Gene mapping of the Usher syndromes. In: Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America. 1992 ; Vol. 25, No. 5. pp. 923-934.
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