Gender-dependence of bone structure and properties in adult osteogenesis imperfecta murine model

Xiaomei Yao, Stephanie M. Carleton, Arin D. Kettle, Jennifer R Keshwani, Charlotte L. Phillips, Yong Wang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is a dominant skeletal disorder characterized by bone fragility and deformities. Though the oim mouse model has been the most widely studied of the OI models, it has only recently been suggested to exhibit gender-dependent differences in bone mineralization. To characterize the impact of gender on the morphometry/ultra-structure, mechanical properties, and biochemical composition of oim bone on the congenic C57BL/J6 background, 4-month-old oim/oim, +/oim, and wild-type (wt) female and male tibiae were evaluated using micro-computed tomography, three-point bending, and Raman spectroscopy. Dramatic gender differences were evident in both cortical and trabecular bone morphological and geometric parameters. Male mice had inherently more bone and increased moment of inertia than genotype-matched female counterparts with corresponding increases in bone biomechanical strength. The primary influence of gender was structure/geometry in bone growth and mechanical properties, whereas the mineral/matrix composition and hydroxyproline content of bone were influenced primarily by the oim collagen mutation. This study provides evidence of the importance of gender in the evaluation and interpretation of potential therapeutic strategies when using mouse models of OI.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1139-1149
Number of pages11
JournalAnnals of biomedical engineering
Volume41
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2013

Fingerprint

Bone
Hydroxyproline
Mechanical properties
Chemical analysis
Collagen
Tomography
Raman spectroscopy
Minerals
Geometry

Keywords

  • Bone
  • Gender
  • Mouse
  • Osteogenesis imperfecta
  • oim/oim

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

Gender-dependence of bone structure and properties in adult osteogenesis imperfecta murine model. / Yao, Xiaomei; Carleton, Stephanie M.; Kettle, Arin D.; Keshwani, Jennifer R; Phillips, Charlotte L.; Wang, Yong.

In: Annals of biomedical engineering, Vol. 41, No. 6, 01.06.2013, p. 1139-1149.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Yao, Xiaomei ; Carleton, Stephanie M. ; Kettle, Arin D. ; Keshwani, Jennifer R ; Phillips, Charlotte L. ; Wang, Yong. / Gender-dependence of bone structure and properties in adult osteogenesis imperfecta murine model. In: Annals of biomedical engineering. 2013 ; Vol. 41, No. 6. pp. 1139-1149.
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