Gender-based comorbidity in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo

Oluwaseye Ayoola Ogun, Kristen L Janky, Edward S. Cohn, Bela Büki, Yunxia W Lundberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It has been noted that benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) may be associated with certain disorders and medical procedures. However, most studies to date were done in Europe, and epidemiological data on the United States (US) population are scarce. Gender-based information is even rarer. Furthermore, it is difficult to assess the relative prevalence of each type of association based solely on literature data, because different comorbidities were reported by various groups from different countries using different patient populations and possibly different inclusion/exclusion criteria. In this study, we surveyed and analyzed a large adult BPPV population (n=1,360 surveyed, 227 completed, most of which were recurrent BPPV cases) from Omaha, NE, US, and its vicinity, all diagnosed at Boys Town National Research Hospital (BTNRH) over the past decade using established and consistent diagnostic criteria. In addition, we performed a retrospective analysis of patients' diagnostic records (n=1,377, with 1,360 adults and 17 children). The following comorbidities were found to be significantly more prevalent in the BPPV population when compared to the age- and gender-matched general population: ear/hearing problems, head injury, thyroid problems, allergies, high cholesterol, headaches, and numbness/paralysis. There were gender differences in the comorbidities. In addition, familial predisposition was fairly common among the participants. Thus, the data confirm some previously reported comorbidities, identify new ones (hearing loss, thyroid problems, high cholesterol, and numbness/paralysis), and suggest possible predisposing and triggering factors and events for BPPV.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere105546
JournalPloS one
Volume9
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 4 2014

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Audition
Comorbidity
Cholesterol
Allergies
gender
Hypesthesia
Population
hearing
paralysis
Paralysis
Thyroid Gland
cholesterol
headache
Craniocerebral Trauma
Hearing Loss
gender differences
hypersensitivity
towns
Causality
Hearing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)
  • General

Cite this

Gender-based comorbidity in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. / Ogun, Oluwaseye Ayoola; Janky, Kristen L; Cohn, Edward S.; Büki, Bela; Lundberg, Yunxia W.

In: PloS one, Vol. 9, No. 9, e105546, 04.09.2014.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ogun, Oluwaseye Ayoola ; Janky, Kristen L ; Cohn, Edward S. ; Büki, Bela ; Lundberg, Yunxia W. / Gender-based comorbidity in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. In: PloS one. 2014 ; Vol. 9, No. 9.
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