Gallium-inducible transferrin-independent iron acquisition is a property of many cell types

Possible role of alterations in the plasma membrane

Oyebode Olakanmi, John B. Stokes, Bradley E Britigan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: We have previously shown that human myeloid cell types can acquire large amounts of iron (Fe)3+ from low-molecular-weight chelates by a process that is independent of adenosine triphosphate and dramatically increased by gallium (Ga) and other multivalent cationic metals. Methods: To provide further insight into the mechanism responsible and its relevance to other cellular systems, we investigated Fe acquisition from nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) by several myeloid and nonmyeloid cell lines in the presence and absence of Ga. Results: Most nonmyeloid cells examined exhibited similar ability to acquire Fe from NTA. Ga increased the apparent maximum velocity (Vmax), with minimal changes in apparent Michaelis constant (Km), of all cell lines. Both erythrocytes and erythrocyte ghosts acquired Fe from NTA, which increased with Ga exposure, analogous to nucleated cells. However, liposomes made from phospholipids did not exhibit Ga-inducible Fe association. Enzymes that modify surface proteins and carbohydrates did not alter HL-60 cell Fe acquisition. Modifying HL-60 membrane fatty acid content had only a minimal effect. Ga exposure did not change membrane potential or fluidity. However, electron microscopy suggested that Ga alters plasma membrane physical properties. Conclusion: Multivalent cations appear to induce changes in cell membranes that may alter their interaction with Fe3+ and probably other multivalent cations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)143-153
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of Investigative Medicine
Volume53
Issue number3
StatePublished - Jan 1 2005

Fingerprint

Gallium
Cell membranes
Transferrin
Iron
Cell Membrane
Nitrilotriacetic Acid
Myeloid Cells
Cations
Cells
Membranes
Cell Line
Membrane Fluidity
Fluidity
HL-60 Cells
Erythrocyte Membrane
Liposomes
Membrane Potentials
Electron microscopy
Phospholipids
Electron Microscopy

Keywords

  • Gallium
  • Iron
  • Transport

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Gallium-inducible transferrin-independent iron acquisition is a property of many cell types : Possible role of alterations in the plasma membrane. / Olakanmi, Oyebode; Stokes, John B.; Britigan, Bradley E.

In: Journal of Investigative Medicine, Vol. 53, No. 3, 01.01.2005, p. 143-153.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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