Future possible genetically engineered crops and traits and their potential environmental impacts

Rebecca Grumet, Lareesa Wolfenbarger, Alejandra Ferenczi

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

THE "FIRST WAVE" OF GENETICALLY ENGINEERED (GE) CROPS WAS FOCUSED NEARLY exclusively on very high acreage crops and a handful of readily cloned, highly effective genes conferring insect resistance and herbicide tolerance (table 1). There were also a few instances of genetically engineered virus resistance in squash and papaya, but together they have accounted for less than 0.1% of transgenic acreage (Brookes and Barfoot 2006; James 2006).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationEnvironmental Safety of Genetically Engineered Crops
PublisherMichigan State University Press
Pages47-57
Number of pages11
ISBN (Print)9781611860085
StatePublished - Dec 1 2012

Fingerprint

environmental impact
tolerance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Grumet, R., Wolfenbarger, L., & Ferenczi, A. (2012). Future possible genetically engineered crops and traits and their potential environmental impacts. In Environmental Safety of Genetically Engineered Crops (pp. 47-57). Michigan State University Press.

Future possible genetically engineered crops and traits and their potential environmental impacts. / Grumet, Rebecca; Wolfenbarger, Lareesa; Ferenczi, Alejandra.

Environmental Safety of Genetically Engineered Crops. Michigan State University Press, 2012. p. 47-57.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Grumet, R, Wolfenbarger, L & Ferenczi, A 2012, Future possible genetically engineered crops and traits and their potential environmental impacts. in Environmental Safety of Genetically Engineered Crops. Michigan State University Press, pp. 47-57.
Grumet R, Wolfenbarger L, Ferenczi A. Future possible genetically engineered crops and traits and their potential environmental impacts. In Environmental Safety of Genetically Engineered Crops. Michigan State University Press. 2012. p. 47-57
Grumet, Rebecca ; Wolfenbarger, Lareesa ; Ferenczi, Alejandra. / Future possible genetically engineered crops and traits and their potential environmental impacts. Environmental Safety of Genetically Engineered Crops. Michigan State University Press, 2012. pp. 47-57
@inbook{061ea920820d4c319ecdaa41b014c0e1,
title = "Future possible genetically engineered crops and traits and their potential environmental impacts",
abstract = "THE {"}FIRST WAVE{"} OF GENETICALLY ENGINEERED (GE) CROPS WAS FOCUSED NEARLY exclusively on very high acreage crops and a handful of readily cloned, highly effective genes conferring insect resistance and herbicide tolerance (table 1). There were also a few instances of genetically engineered virus resistance in squash and papaya, but together they have accounted for less than 0.1{\%} of transgenic acreage (Brookes and Barfoot 2006; James 2006).",
author = "Rebecca Grumet and Lareesa Wolfenbarger and Alejandra Ferenczi",
year = "2012",
month = "12",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
isbn = "9781611860085",
pages = "47--57",
booktitle = "Environmental Safety of Genetically Engineered Crops",
publisher = "Michigan State University Press",

}

TY - CHAP

T1 - Future possible genetically engineered crops and traits and their potential environmental impacts

AU - Grumet, Rebecca

AU - Wolfenbarger, Lareesa

AU - Ferenczi, Alejandra

PY - 2012/12/1

Y1 - 2012/12/1

N2 - THE "FIRST WAVE" OF GENETICALLY ENGINEERED (GE) CROPS WAS FOCUSED NEARLY exclusively on very high acreage crops and a handful of readily cloned, highly effective genes conferring insect resistance and herbicide tolerance (table 1). There were also a few instances of genetically engineered virus resistance in squash and papaya, but together they have accounted for less than 0.1% of transgenic acreage (Brookes and Barfoot 2006; James 2006).

AB - THE "FIRST WAVE" OF GENETICALLY ENGINEERED (GE) CROPS WAS FOCUSED NEARLY exclusively on very high acreage crops and a handful of readily cloned, highly effective genes conferring insect resistance and herbicide tolerance (table 1). There were also a few instances of genetically engineered virus resistance in squash and papaya, but together they have accounted for less than 0.1% of transgenic acreage (Brookes and Barfoot 2006; James 2006).

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84857922780&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84857922780&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Chapter

AN - SCOPUS:84857922780

SN - 9781611860085

SP - 47

EP - 57

BT - Environmental Safety of Genetically Engineered Crops

PB - Michigan State University Press

ER -