Further Inspection Into the Effects of Correctional Officers’ Sex, Race, and Perceptions of Safety on Job-Related Attitudes

John Wooldredge, Benjamin Steiner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

This article examines more closely the empirical relationships between correctional officers’ job attitudes and officer demographics and perceptions of safety. Bi-level analyses from 1,740 officers in 45 prisons revealed that officers’ sex and race mattered for shaping an officer’s pride with co-workers, consideration of transferring to another facility, and perceptions of co-workers’ job satisfaction, but only as they were linked to perceptions of sexism and racism. Perceptions of safety also mattered. Yet, levels of inmate crime and victimization were irrelevant for shaping attitudes. Positive attitudes were also more common in facilities housing higher risk populations, and in facilities for men.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)576-599
Number of pages24
JournalPrison Journal
Volume96
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2016

Fingerprint

co-worker
sexism
job satisfaction
victimization
racism
correctional institution
housing
offense

Keywords

  • correctional officers
  • officer job attitudes
  • prisons

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences (miscellaneous)
  • Law

Cite this

Further Inspection Into the Effects of Correctional Officers’ Sex, Race, and Perceptions of Safety on Job-Related Attitudes. / Wooldredge, John; Steiner, Benjamin.

In: Prison Journal, Vol. 96, No. 4, 01.09.2016, p. 576-599.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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