Functional consequences of differential O-glycosylation of MUC1, MUC4, and MUC16 (Downstream effects on signaling)

Ryan L. Hanson, Michael A Hollingsworth

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

15 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Glycosylation is one of the most abundant post-translational modifications that occur within the cell. Under normal physiological conditions, O-linked glycosylation of extracellular proteins is critical for both structure and function. During the progression of cancer, however, the expression of aberrant and truncated glycans is commonly observed. Mucins are high molecular weight glycoproteins that contain numerous sites of O-glycosylation within their extracellular domains. Transmembrane mucins also play a functional role in monitoring the surrounding microenvironment and transducing these signals into the cell. In cancer, these mucins often take on an oncogenic role and promote a number of pro-tumorigenic effects, including pro-survival, migratory, and invasive behaviors. Within this review, we highlight both the processes involved in the expression of aberrant glycan structures on mucins, as well as the potential downstream impacts on cellular signaling.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number34
JournalBiomolecules
Volume6
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2016

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Glycosylation
Mucins
Polysaccharides
Cell signaling
Post Translational Protein Processing
Neoplasms
Glycoproteins
Molecular Weight
Molecular weight
Monitoring
Proteins

Keywords

  • Cancer
  • MUC1
  • MUC16
  • MUC4
  • Mucin
  • O-glycosylation
  • Signaling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology

Cite this

Functional consequences of differential O-glycosylation of MUC1, MUC4, and MUC16 (Downstream effects on signaling). / Hanson, Ryan L.; Hollingsworth, Michael A.

In: Biomolecules, Vol. 6, No. 3, 34, 09.2016.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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