Fruit and vegetable intake during infancy and early childhood

Kirsten A. Grimm, Sonia A. Kim, Amy L. Yaroch, Kelley S. Scanlon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: To examine the association of timing of introduction and frequency of fruit and vegetable intake during infancy with frequency of fruit and vegetable intake at age 6 years in a cohort of US children. Copyright

Methods: We analyzed data on fruit and vegetable intake during late infancy, age of fruit and vegetable introduction, and frequency of fruit and vegetable intake at 6 years from the Infant Feeding Practices Study II and the Year 6 Follow-Up (Y6FU) Study. We determined the percent of 6-year-old children consuming fruits and vegetables less than once per day and examined associations with infant fruit and vegetable intake using logistic regression modeling, controlling for multiple covariates (n = 1078).

Results: Based on maternal report, 31.9% of 6-year-old children consumed fruit less than once daily and 19.0% consumed vegetables less than once daily. In adjusted analyses, children who consumed fruits and vegetables less than once daily during late infancy had increased odds of eating fruits and vegetables less than once daily at age 6 years (fruit, adjusted odds ratio: 2.48; vegetables, adjusted odds ratio: 2.40). Age of introduction of fruits and vegetables was not associated with intake at age 6 years.

Conclusions: Our study suggests that infrequent intake of fruits and vegetables during late infancy is associated with infrequent intake of these foods at 6 years of age. These findings highlight the importance of infant feeding guidance that encourages intake of fruits and vegetables and the need to examine barriers to fruit and vegetable intake during infancy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S63-S69
JournalPediatrics
Volume134
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2014

Fingerprint

Vegetables
Fruit
Intake
Early childhood
Infancy
Eating
Odds Ratio
Logistic Models
Mothers

Keywords

  • Age of introduction
  • Frequency of intake
  • Fruits
  • Infant Feeding Practice Study II
  • Vegetables
  • Year 6 Follow-Up Study

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Grimm, K. A., Kim, S. A., Yaroch, A. L., & Scanlon, K. S. (2014). Fruit and vegetable intake during infancy and early childhood. Pediatrics, 134, S63-S69. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2014-0646K

Fruit and vegetable intake during infancy and early childhood. / Grimm, Kirsten A.; Kim, Sonia A.; Yaroch, Amy L.; Scanlon, Kelley S.

In: Pediatrics, Vol. 134, 01.09.2014, p. S63-S69.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Grimm, KA, Kim, SA, Yaroch, AL & Scanlon, KS 2014, 'Fruit and vegetable intake during infancy and early childhood', Pediatrics, vol. 134, pp. S63-S69. https://doi.org/10.1542/peds.2014-0646K
Grimm, Kirsten A. ; Kim, Sonia A. ; Yaroch, Amy L. ; Scanlon, Kelley S. / Fruit and vegetable intake during infancy and early childhood. In: Pediatrics. 2014 ; Vol. 134. pp. S63-S69.
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