Frequency of Chronic Joint Pain Following Chikungunya Virus Infection: A Colombian Cohort Study

Aileen Y. Chang, Liliana Encinales, Alexandra Porras, Nelly Pacheco, St Patrick Reid, Karen A.O. Martins, Shamila Pacheco, Eyda Bravo, Marianda Navarno, Alejandro Rico Mendoza, Richard Amdur, Priyanka Kamalapathy, Gary S. Firestein, Jeffrey M. Bethony, Gary L. Simon

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To estimate the frequency of chronic joint pain after infection with chikungunya virus in a Latin American cohort. Methods: A cross-sectional follow-up of a prospective cohort of 500 patients from the Atlántico Department, Colombia who were clinically diagnosed as having chikungunya virus during the 2014–2015 epidemic was conducted. Baseline symptoms and follow-up symptoms at 20 months were evaluated in serologically confirmed cases. Results: Among the 500 patients enrolled, 485 had serologically confirmed chikungunya virus and reported joint pain status. Patients were predominantly adults (mean ± SD age 49 ± 16 years) and female, had an education level of high school or less, and were of Mestizo ethnicity. The most commonly affected joints were the small joints, including the wrists, ankles, and fingers. The initial virus symptoms lasted a median of 4 days (interquartile range [IQR] 3–8 days). Sixteen percent of the participants reported missing school or work (median 4 days [IQR 2–7 days]). After 20 months, one-fourth of the participants had persistent joint pain. A multivariable analysis indicated that significant predictors of persistent joint pain included college graduate status, initial symptoms of headache or knee pain, missed work, normal activities affected, ≥4 days of initial symptoms, and ≥4 weeks of initial joint pain. Conclusion: This is the first report to describe the frequency of chikungunya virus–related arthritis in the Americas after a 20-month follow-up. The high frequency of chronic disease highlights the need for the development of prevention and treatment methods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)578-584
Number of pages7
JournalArthritis and Rheumatology
Volume70
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2018

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Arthralgia
Chronic Pain
Cohort Studies
Chikungunya virus
Wrist Joint
Colombia
Ankle
Fingers
Arthritis
Headache
Knee
Chronic Disease
Joints
Chikungunya Fever
Viruses
Education
Pain

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Rheumatology
  • Immunology

Cite this

Chang, A. Y., Encinales, L., Porras, A., Pacheco, N., Reid, S. P., Martins, K. A. O., ... Simon, G. L. (2018). Frequency of Chronic Joint Pain Following Chikungunya Virus Infection: A Colombian Cohort Study. Arthritis and Rheumatology, 70(4), 578-584. https://doi.org/10.1002/art.40384

Frequency of Chronic Joint Pain Following Chikungunya Virus Infection : A Colombian Cohort Study. / Chang, Aileen Y.; Encinales, Liliana; Porras, Alexandra; Pacheco, Nelly; Reid, St Patrick; Martins, Karen A.O.; Pacheco, Shamila; Bravo, Eyda; Navarno, Marianda; Rico Mendoza, Alejandro; Amdur, Richard; Kamalapathy, Priyanka; Firestein, Gary S.; Bethony, Jeffrey M.; Simon, Gary L.

In: Arthritis and Rheumatology, Vol. 70, No. 4, 04.2018, p. 578-584.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chang, AY, Encinales, L, Porras, A, Pacheco, N, Reid, SP, Martins, KAO, Pacheco, S, Bravo, E, Navarno, M, Rico Mendoza, A, Amdur, R, Kamalapathy, P, Firestein, GS, Bethony, JM & Simon, GL 2018, 'Frequency of Chronic Joint Pain Following Chikungunya Virus Infection: A Colombian Cohort Study', Arthritis and Rheumatology, vol. 70, no. 4, pp. 578-584. https://doi.org/10.1002/art.40384
Chang, Aileen Y. ; Encinales, Liliana ; Porras, Alexandra ; Pacheco, Nelly ; Reid, St Patrick ; Martins, Karen A.O. ; Pacheco, Shamila ; Bravo, Eyda ; Navarno, Marianda ; Rico Mendoza, Alejandro ; Amdur, Richard ; Kamalapathy, Priyanka ; Firestein, Gary S. ; Bethony, Jeffrey M. ; Simon, Gary L. / Frequency of Chronic Joint Pain Following Chikungunya Virus Infection : A Colombian Cohort Study. In: Arthritis and Rheumatology. 2018 ; Vol. 70, No. 4. pp. 578-584.
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AU - Pacheco, Nelly

AU - Reid, St Patrick

AU - Martins, Karen A.O.

AU - Pacheco, Shamila

AU - Bravo, Eyda

AU - Navarno, Marianda

AU - Rico Mendoza, Alejandro

AU - Amdur, Richard

AU - Kamalapathy, Priyanka

AU - Firestein, Gary S.

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