Fracture toughness comparison of six resin composites

Hidehiko Watanabe, Satish C. Khera, Marcos A. Vargas, Fang Qian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

47 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: This study investigated the Mode I and II fracture toughness values of resin composites used for the restorations of anterior teeth by the Brazilian disk test method. Methods: The Brazilian disk test was performed on six commercially available dental resin composites, VenusTM (hybrid resin composite), Durafill® (micro-filled resin composite), GradiaTM (micro-filled/hybrid resin composite), Point 4TM (hybrid resin composite), SupremeTM (nano-particle resin composite) and Filtek Z250™ (resin composite with zirconia particles). Five resin composite disks of 25 mm in diameter and 2 mm in thickness with chevron notches were prepared for each fracture mode per material. The specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 h at 37 °C, and then tested by a Zwick testing machine under compression mode with a constant crosshead speed of 0.25 mm/min at room temperature. The stress intensity factors under combined Modes I and II fracture toughness were calculated by the formula presented by Atkinson et al. The fracture patterns of two specimens randomly selected from each test group were examined using a scanning electron microscope. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed for the statistical evaluations followed by the post-hoc Tukey's Student Range (HSD) test. Results: The highest mean Mode I and II fracture toughness values were found in Filtek Z250™ and Filtek™ Supreme and they were significantly higher than other materials (comparisons significant at the 0.05 level). The intermediate group consisted of Point4TM, VenusTM and GradiaTM ANTERIOR, whereas Durafill®, statistically, had the lowest mean value for fracture toughness. Significance: Fracture toughness values of hybrid and nano-particle resin composites are significantly higher than those of micro-filled resin composites. This suggests that the latter should be used for non-stress bearing areas.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)418-425
Number of pages8
JournalDental Materials
Volume24
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2008

Fingerprint

Composite Resins
Fracture toughness
Resins
Composite materials
Bearings (structural)
Analysis of variance (ANOVA)
Stress intensity factors
Restoration
Electron microscopes
Analysis of Variance
Tooth
Students
Zirconia
Scanning
Electrons
Water
Testing
Temperature

Keywords

  • Brazilian disk test
  • Fracture toughness
  • Resin composite

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Materials Science(all)
  • Dentistry(all)
  • Mechanics of Materials

Cite this

Watanabe, H., Khera, S. C., Vargas, M. A., & Qian, F. (2008). Fracture toughness comparison of six resin composites. Dental Materials, 24(3), 418-425. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dental.2007.06.018

Fracture toughness comparison of six resin composites. / Watanabe, Hidehiko; Khera, Satish C.; Vargas, Marcos A.; Qian, Fang.

In: Dental Materials, Vol. 24, No. 3, 01.03.2008, p. 418-425.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Watanabe, H, Khera, SC, Vargas, MA & Qian, F 2008, 'Fracture toughness comparison of six resin composites', Dental Materials, vol. 24, no. 3, pp. 418-425. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.dental.2007.06.018
Watanabe, Hidehiko ; Khera, Satish C. ; Vargas, Marcos A. ; Qian, Fang. / Fracture toughness comparison of six resin composites. In: Dental Materials. 2008 ; Vol. 24, No. 3. pp. 418-425.
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