Force transducers for the evaluation of labial, lingual, and mandibular motor impairments

S. M. Barlow, J. H. Abbs

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

64 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Three transducers were developed for evaluating lip, tongue, and jaw muscle force control in individuals with motor speech disorders. The rationale for the development of these transducers was based upon the hypothesized need for clinical assessment of the individual motor subsystems of the speech production mechanism. To provide an indication of the utility of these devices, exemplary force control data from adults with Parkinson's disease and spastic cerebral palsy are provided. Observations of differential force control impairment in the labial, lingual, and mandibular subsystems of these dysarthric individuals supported the rationale for this development. Observations were made also concerning the utility of these nonspeech measures for predicting speech motor dysfunction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)616-621
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Speech and Hearing Research
Volume26
Issue number4
StatePublished - Dec 1 1983

Fingerprint

Lip
Transducers
Tongue
subsystem
Speech Disorders
Needs Assessment
Cerebral Palsy
Jaw
evaluation
Parkinson Disease
physical disability
speech disorder
Equipment and Supplies
Muscles
indication
Disease
Impairment
Evaluation
Motor Disorders

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Force transducers for the evaluation of labial, lingual, and mandibular motor impairments. / Barlow, S. M.; Abbs, J. H.

In: Journal of Speech and Hearing Research, Vol. 26, No. 4, 01.12.1983, p. 616-621.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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