For What Illnesses Is a Disease Management Program Most Effective?

Eric Jutkowitz, John A. Nyman, Tzeyu L. Michaud, Jean M. Abraham, Bryan Dowd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: We examined the impact of a disease management (DM) program offered at the University of Minnesota for those with various chronic diseases. METHODS: Differences-in-differences regression equations were estimated to determine the effect of DM participation by chronic condition on expenditures, absenteeism, hospitalizations, and avoidable hospitalizations. RESULTS: Disease management reduced health care expenditures for individuals with asthma, cardiovascular disease, congestive heart failure, depression, musculoskeletal problems, low back pain, and migraines. Disease management reduced hospitalizations for those same conditions except for congestive heart failure and reduced avoidable hospitalizations for individuals with asthma, depression, and low back pain. Disease management did not have any effect for individuals with diabetes, arthritis, or osteoporosis, nor did DM have any effect on absenteeism. CONCLUSIONS: Employers should focus on those conditions that generate savings when purchasing DM programs. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: This study suggests that the University of Minnesota's DM program reduces hospitalizations for individuals with asthma, cardiovascular disease, depression, musculoskeletal problems, low back pain, and migraines. The program also reduced avoidable hospitalizations for individuals with asthma, depression, and low back pain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)117-123
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of occupational and environmental medicine
Volume57
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 13 2015

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Disease Management
Hospitalization
Low Back Pain
Asthma
Depression
Absenteeism
Health Expenditures
Migraine Disorders
Cardiovascular Diseases
Heart Failure
Osteoporosis
Arthritis
Chronic Disease
Delivery of Health Care

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

For What Illnesses Is a Disease Management Program Most Effective? / Jutkowitz, Eric; Nyman, John A.; Michaud, Tzeyu L.; Abraham, Jean M.; Dowd, Bryan.

In: Journal of occupational and environmental medicine, Vol. 57, No. 2, 13.02.2015, p. 117-123.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Jutkowitz, Eric ; Nyman, John A. ; Michaud, Tzeyu L. ; Abraham, Jean M. ; Dowd, Bryan. / For What Illnesses Is a Disease Management Program Most Effective?. In: Journal of occupational and environmental medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 57, No. 2. pp. 117-123.
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