Food or medicine: Ethnic variations in perceptions of advanced cancer patients and their caregivers regarding artificial hydration during the last weeks of life

Isabel Torres-Vigil, Marlene Z. Cohen, Allison de la Rosa, Marylou Cárdenas-Turanzas, Beth E Burbach, Kenneth W. Tarleton, Whey May Shen, Eduardo Bruera

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose: To identify whether advanced cancer patients receiving home hospice care and their primary caregivers view artificial hydration (AH) as food or medicine, and the demographic and clinical factors influencing these perceptions. Methods: Participants were enrolled in a randomised, double-blind controlled trial examining the efficacy of AH in cancer hospice patients. In-depth interviews at days 1 and 4 of study enrolment explored the meanings attributed to AH at the end of life. Responses to the question, 'Are these fluids more like food or more like medicine?' were categorised as 'food', 'medicine', 'both' or 'other'. χ2 analyses were conducted with data from 122 interviews (54 patients and 68 caregivers) to identify differences between patients and caregivers, and by gender, age, ethnicity and caregiver relationship. Predictors of perceptions were identified using logistic regression analysis. Results: Overall, 47 participants (38%) understood the fluids to be more like food, 41 (34%) as medicine, 17 (14%) as both, and 17 (14%) as 'other'. Ethnic minority participants (n=34, 66%) were significantly more likely than non-Hispanic European Americans (n=30, 42%) to view AH as food, or both as food and medicine (p=0.034). Ethnic differences persisted in the final regression model (OR 2.7; 95% CI 1.3 to 5.7, p=0.010). No significant differences were detected between patients and caregivers, or across gender, age, caregivers' relationship to the patients, group assignment, disease severity or cancer type. Conclusions: AH was perceived as food/nutrition by many cancer patients and caregivers in the study, particularly among ethnic minorities. This perception may lead to greater distress if fluids are discontinued or withheld. Asking patients/caregivers about their AH perceptions may enhance patient/provider communication and culturally appropriate end-of-life care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)276-279
Number of pages4
JournalBMJ Supportive and Palliative Care
Volume2
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2012

Fingerprint

Caregivers
Medicine
Food
Neoplasms
Interviews
Hospice Care
Hospices
Terminal Care
Clinical Medicine
Home Care Services
Logistic Models
Communication
Regression Analysis
Demography

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Oncology(nursing)
  • Medical–Surgical

Cite this

Food or medicine : Ethnic variations in perceptions of advanced cancer patients and their caregivers regarding artificial hydration during the last weeks of life. / Torres-Vigil, Isabel; Cohen, Marlene Z.; de la Rosa, Allison; Cárdenas-Turanzas, Marylou; Burbach, Beth E; Tarleton, Kenneth W.; Shen, Whey May; Bruera, Eduardo.

In: BMJ Supportive and Palliative Care, Vol. 2, No. 3, 01.01.2012, p. 276-279.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Torres-Vigil, Isabel ; Cohen, Marlene Z. ; de la Rosa, Allison ; Cárdenas-Turanzas, Marylou ; Burbach, Beth E ; Tarleton, Kenneth W. ; Shen, Whey May ; Bruera, Eduardo. / Food or medicine : Ethnic variations in perceptions of advanced cancer patients and their caregivers regarding artificial hydration during the last weeks of life. In: BMJ Supportive and Palliative Care. 2012 ; Vol. 2, No. 3. pp. 276-279.
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abstract = "Purpose: To identify whether advanced cancer patients receiving home hospice care and their primary caregivers view artificial hydration (AH) as food or medicine, and the demographic and clinical factors influencing these perceptions. Methods: Participants were enrolled in a randomised, double-blind controlled trial examining the efficacy of AH in cancer hospice patients. In-depth interviews at days 1 and 4 of study enrolment explored the meanings attributed to AH at the end of life. Responses to the question, 'Are these fluids more like food or more like medicine?' were categorised as 'food', 'medicine', 'both' or 'other'. χ2 analyses were conducted with data from 122 interviews (54 patients and 68 caregivers) to identify differences between patients and caregivers, and by gender, age, ethnicity and caregiver relationship. Predictors of perceptions were identified using logistic regression analysis. Results: Overall, 47 participants (38{\%}) understood the fluids to be more like food, 41 (34{\%}) as medicine, 17 (14{\%}) as both, and 17 (14{\%}) as 'other'. Ethnic minority participants (n=34, 66{\%}) were significantly more likely than non-Hispanic European Americans (n=30, 42{\%}) to view AH as food, or both as food and medicine (p=0.034). Ethnic differences persisted in the final regression model (OR 2.7; 95{\%} CI 1.3 to 5.7, p=0.010). No significant differences were detected between patients and caregivers, or across gender, age, caregivers' relationship to the patients, group assignment, disease severity or cancer type. Conclusions: AH was perceived as food/nutrition by many cancer patients and caregivers in the study, particularly among ethnic minorities. This perception may lead to greater distress if fluids are discontinued or withheld. Asking patients/caregivers about their AH perceptions may enhance patient/provider communication and culturally appropriate end-of-life care.",
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AU - Torres-Vigil, Isabel

AU - Cohen, Marlene Z.

AU - de la Rosa, Allison

AU - Cárdenas-Turanzas, Marylou

AU - Burbach, Beth E

AU - Tarleton, Kenneth W.

AU - Shen, Whey May

AU - Bruera, Eduardo

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N2 - Purpose: To identify whether advanced cancer patients receiving home hospice care and their primary caregivers view artificial hydration (AH) as food or medicine, and the demographic and clinical factors influencing these perceptions. Methods: Participants were enrolled in a randomised, double-blind controlled trial examining the efficacy of AH in cancer hospice patients. In-depth interviews at days 1 and 4 of study enrolment explored the meanings attributed to AH at the end of life. Responses to the question, 'Are these fluids more like food or more like medicine?' were categorised as 'food', 'medicine', 'both' or 'other'. χ2 analyses were conducted with data from 122 interviews (54 patients and 68 caregivers) to identify differences between patients and caregivers, and by gender, age, ethnicity and caregiver relationship. Predictors of perceptions were identified using logistic regression analysis. Results: Overall, 47 participants (38%) understood the fluids to be more like food, 41 (34%) as medicine, 17 (14%) as both, and 17 (14%) as 'other'. Ethnic minority participants (n=34, 66%) were significantly more likely than non-Hispanic European Americans (n=30, 42%) to view AH as food, or both as food and medicine (p=0.034). Ethnic differences persisted in the final regression model (OR 2.7; 95% CI 1.3 to 5.7, p=0.010). No significant differences were detected between patients and caregivers, or across gender, age, caregivers' relationship to the patients, group assignment, disease severity or cancer type. Conclusions: AH was perceived as food/nutrition by many cancer patients and caregivers in the study, particularly among ethnic minorities. This perception may lead to greater distress if fluids are discontinued or withheld. Asking patients/caregivers about their AH perceptions may enhance patient/provider communication and culturally appropriate end-of-life care.

AB - Purpose: To identify whether advanced cancer patients receiving home hospice care and their primary caregivers view artificial hydration (AH) as food or medicine, and the demographic and clinical factors influencing these perceptions. Methods: Participants were enrolled in a randomised, double-blind controlled trial examining the efficacy of AH in cancer hospice patients. In-depth interviews at days 1 and 4 of study enrolment explored the meanings attributed to AH at the end of life. Responses to the question, 'Are these fluids more like food or more like medicine?' were categorised as 'food', 'medicine', 'both' or 'other'. χ2 analyses were conducted with data from 122 interviews (54 patients and 68 caregivers) to identify differences between patients and caregivers, and by gender, age, ethnicity and caregiver relationship. Predictors of perceptions were identified using logistic regression analysis. Results: Overall, 47 participants (38%) understood the fluids to be more like food, 41 (34%) as medicine, 17 (14%) as both, and 17 (14%) as 'other'. Ethnic minority participants (n=34, 66%) were significantly more likely than non-Hispanic European Americans (n=30, 42%) to view AH as food, or both as food and medicine (p=0.034). Ethnic differences persisted in the final regression model (OR 2.7; 95% CI 1.3 to 5.7, p=0.010). No significant differences were detected between patients and caregivers, or across gender, age, caregivers' relationship to the patients, group assignment, disease severity or cancer type. Conclusions: AH was perceived as food/nutrition by many cancer patients and caregivers in the study, particularly among ethnic minorities. This perception may lead to greater distress if fluids are discontinued or withheld. Asking patients/caregivers about their AH perceptions may enhance patient/provider communication and culturally appropriate end-of-life care.

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