Abstract

Background We hypothesized that slow crystalloid resuscitation would result in less blood loss and a smaller hemoglobin decrease compared to a rapid resuscitation during uncontrolled hemorrhage. Methods Anesthetized, splenectomized domestic swine underwent hepatic lobar hemitransection. Lactated Ringers was given at 150 or 20 mL/min IV (rapid vs. slow, respectively, N = 12 per group; limit of 100 mL/kg). Primary endpoints were blood loss and serum hemoglobin; secondary endpoints included survival, vital signs, coagulation parameters, and blood gases. Results The slow group had a less blood loss (1.6 vs. 2.7 L, respectively) and a higher final hemoglobin concentration (6.0 vs. 3.4 g/dL). Conclusions Using a fixed volume of crystalloid resuscitation in this porcine model of uncontrolled intraabdominal hemorrhage, a slow IV infusion rate produced less blood loss and a smaller hemoglobin decrease compared to rapid infusion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere0207708
JournalPloS one
Volume13
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2018

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hemorrhage
Resuscitation
hemoglobin
Hemoglobins
Blood
Swine
Hemorrhage
swine
Fluids
blood
endpoints
Vital Signs
blood gases
Blood Coagulation
blood serum
coagulation
Coagulation
Gases
liver
fluids

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

Fluid administration rate for uncontrolled intraabdominal hemorrhage in swine. / Yanala, Ujwal R.; Johanning, Jason M; Pipinos, Iraklis I; High, Robin R.; Larsen, Gustavo; Velander, William H; Carlson, Mark Alan.

In: PloS one, Vol. 13, No. 11, e0207708, 11.2018.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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AU - Yanala, Ujwal R.

AU - Johanning, Jason M

AU - Pipinos, Iraklis I

AU - High, Robin R.

AU - Larsen, Gustavo

AU - Velander, William H

AU - Carlson, Mark Alan

PY - 2018/11

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N2 - Background We hypothesized that slow crystalloid resuscitation would result in less blood loss and a smaller hemoglobin decrease compared to a rapid resuscitation during uncontrolled hemorrhage. Methods Anesthetized, splenectomized domestic swine underwent hepatic lobar hemitransection. Lactated Ringers was given at 150 or 20 mL/min IV (rapid vs. slow, respectively, N = 12 per group; limit of 100 mL/kg). Primary endpoints were blood loss and serum hemoglobin; secondary endpoints included survival, vital signs, coagulation parameters, and blood gases. Results The slow group had a less blood loss (1.6 vs. 2.7 L, respectively) and a higher final hemoglobin concentration (6.0 vs. 3.4 g/dL). Conclusions Using a fixed volume of crystalloid resuscitation in this porcine model of uncontrolled intraabdominal hemorrhage, a slow IV infusion rate produced less blood loss and a smaller hemoglobin decrease compared to rapid infusion.

AB - Background We hypothesized that slow crystalloid resuscitation would result in less blood loss and a smaller hemoglobin decrease compared to a rapid resuscitation during uncontrolled hemorrhage. Methods Anesthetized, splenectomized domestic swine underwent hepatic lobar hemitransection. Lactated Ringers was given at 150 or 20 mL/min IV (rapid vs. slow, respectively, N = 12 per group; limit of 100 mL/kg). Primary endpoints were blood loss and serum hemoglobin; secondary endpoints included survival, vital signs, coagulation parameters, and blood gases. Results The slow group had a less blood loss (1.6 vs. 2.7 L, respectively) and a higher final hemoglobin concentration (6.0 vs. 3.4 g/dL). Conclusions Using a fixed volume of crystalloid resuscitation in this porcine model of uncontrolled intraabdominal hemorrhage, a slow IV infusion rate produced less blood loss and a smaller hemoglobin decrease compared to rapid infusion.

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