Floor/shoe slip resistance measurement

Don B. Chaffin, Jeffrey C. Woldstad, Anna Trujillo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

40 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A variety of slip measurement devices exist that provide estimates of both static and dynamic coefficient-of-friction (COF) values between one's shoes and the floor. Unfortunately, different shoe sole/heel materials, floor conditions, and contaminants will affect the tests in ways that result in widely varying COF estimates. This paper reviews the basic physics of such tests and describes a set of experiments to determine the static and dynamic COF values under operating conditions known to exist in different jobs. The results define a set of conditions wherein low (hazardous) COF values would exist (e.g., hard Neolite™ shoe material in contact with a wet, smooth walking surface). The results also question the use of light-load testing devices and static and slow speed reference COF values in the literature.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)283-289
Number of pages7
JournalAmerican Industrial Hygiene Association Journal
Volume53
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1 1992

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Shoes
Friction
Equipment and Supplies
Heel
Physics
Walking
Light

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Cite this

Floor/shoe slip resistance measurement. / Chaffin, Don B.; Woldstad, Jeffrey C.; Trujillo, Anna.

In: American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal, Vol. 53, No. 5, 01.05.1992, p. 283-289.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chaffin, Don B. ; Woldstad, Jeffrey C. ; Trujillo, Anna. / Floor/shoe slip resistance measurement. In: American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal. 1992 ; Vol. 53, No. 5. pp. 283-289.
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