Finite-temperature anisotropy of magnetic alloys

R. Skomski, O. N. Mryasov, J. Zhou, David J Sellmyer

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The temperature dependence of the magnetic anisotropy of ferromagnetic materials is analyzed. Simple ferromagnets, such as Fe and Co, obey the m=n (n+1) 2 power laws predicted by the Callen and Callen [Phys. Rev. 129, 578 (1963)] theory, but in alloys, the applicability of the theory is an exception rather than the rule. Many alloys, such as the rare-earth transition-metal intermetallics and L 10 magnets, violate a basic assumption of the theory, namely, that the single-ion anisotropy and the spontaneous magnetization have the same origin. This is the reason for significant deviations from the Callen and Callen behavior, such as the m=2 law we obtained for L 10 alloys.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number08E916
JournalJournal of Applied Physics
Volume99
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - May 25 2006

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anisotropy
ferromagnetic materials
temperature
intermetallics
magnets
rare earth elements
transition metals
deviation
magnetization
temperature dependence
ions

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physics and Astronomy(all)

Cite this

Finite-temperature anisotropy of magnetic alloys. / Skomski, R.; Mryasov, O. N.; Zhou, J.; Sellmyer, David J.

In: Journal of Applied Physics, Vol. 99, No. 8, 08E916, 25.05.2006.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Skomski, R. ; Mryasov, O. N. ; Zhou, J. ; Sellmyer, David J. / Finite-temperature anisotropy of magnetic alloys. In: Journal of Applied Physics. 2006 ; Vol. 99, No. 8.
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