Finding the optimal dose of vitamin d following roux-en-y gastric bypass: A prospective, randomized pilot clinical trial

Whitney S Goldner, Julie A. Stoner, Elizabeth Lyden, Jon S Thompson, Karen Taylor, Luann Larson, Judi Erickson, Corrigan L McBride

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

73 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Vitamin D deficiency is common following bariatric surgery and is due to a combination of baseline deficiency and postoperative malabsorption. There are few prospective studies evaluating the appropriate dose of vitamin D to prevent and treat vitamin D deficiency following bariatric surgery. We evaluated three doses of vitamin D3 (800, 2,000, and 5,000 IU/day) in a prospective, randomized pilot trial of 45 patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Serum 25 hydroxy Vitamin D (25OHD), intact PTH (iPTH), calcium, and urine calcium/creatinine ratios were measured at 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Due to a high dropout rate at 24 months, we focus on the 12-month data. At 12 months, the 800-, 2,000-, and 5,000-IU groups had a mean ± SD increase in 25OHD of 27.5∈±∈40.0, 60.2∈±∈37.4, and 66.1∈±∈42.2 nmol/L, respectively (p∈=∈0.09) with a maximum increase in each group of 87.4, 114.8, and 129.8 nmol/L. Forty-four percent, 78%, and 70% achieved 25OHD levels 75 nmol/L (p∈=∈0.38). Results for the 6- and 24-month time points were similar to the 12-month results. Mean weight loss at 24 months of the study was not different among groups (p∈=∈0.52). Serum calcium did not change significantly, and there were no cases of hypercalcemia or sustained hypercalciuria. Higher doses of vitamin D supplementation trend towards higher levels of 25OHD. Vitamin D replacement as high as 5,000 IU /day is safe and necessary in many patients to treat vitamin D deficiency following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass yet is still suboptimal in others.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)173-179
Number of pages7
JournalObesity Surgery
Volume19
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2009

Fingerprint

Gastric Bypass
Vitamin D
Vitamins
Vitamin D Deficiency
Randomized Controlled Trials
Bariatric Surgery
Calcium
Hypercalciuria
Cholecalciferol
Hypercalcemia
Serum
Weight Loss
Creatinine
Urine
Prospective Studies

Keywords

  • Bariatric surgery
  • Obesity
  • Treatment
  • Vitamin D deficiency
  • Vitamin D supplementation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

Finding the optimal dose of vitamin d following roux-en-y gastric bypass : A prospective, randomized pilot clinical trial. / Goldner, Whitney S; Stoner, Julie A.; Lyden, Elizabeth; Thompson, Jon S; Taylor, Karen; Larson, Luann; Erickson, Judi; McBride, Corrigan L.

In: Obesity Surgery, Vol. 19, No. 2, 01.02.2009, p. 173-179.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Goldner, Whitney S ; Stoner, Julie A. ; Lyden, Elizabeth ; Thompson, Jon S ; Taylor, Karen ; Larson, Luann ; Erickson, Judi ; McBride, Corrigan L. / Finding the optimal dose of vitamin d following roux-en-y gastric bypass : A prospective, randomized pilot clinical trial. In: Obesity Surgery. 2009 ; Vol. 19, No. 2. pp. 173-179.
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AU - Thompson, Jon S

AU - Taylor, Karen

AU - Larson, Luann

AU - Erickson, Judi

AU - McBride, Corrigan L

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AB - Background Vitamin D deficiency is common following bariatric surgery and is due to a combination of baseline deficiency and postoperative malabsorption. There are few prospective studies evaluating the appropriate dose of vitamin D to prevent and treat vitamin D deficiency following bariatric surgery. We evaluated three doses of vitamin D3 (800, 2,000, and 5,000 IU/day) in a prospective, randomized pilot trial of 45 patients undergoing Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Serum 25 hydroxy Vitamin D (25OHD), intact PTH (iPTH), calcium, and urine calcium/creatinine ratios were measured at 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Due to a high dropout rate at 24 months, we focus on the 12-month data. At 12 months, the 800-, 2,000-, and 5,000-IU groups had a mean ± SD increase in 25OHD of 27.5∈±∈40.0, 60.2∈±∈37.4, and 66.1∈±∈42.2 nmol/L, respectively (p∈=∈0.09) with a maximum increase in each group of 87.4, 114.8, and 129.8 nmol/L. Forty-four percent, 78%, and 70% achieved 25OHD levels 75 nmol/L (p∈=∈0.38). Results for the 6- and 24-month time points were similar to the 12-month results. Mean weight loss at 24 months of the study was not different among groups (p∈=∈0.52). Serum calcium did not change significantly, and there were no cases of hypercalcemia or sustained hypercalciuria. Higher doses of vitamin D supplementation trend towards higher levels of 25OHD. Vitamin D replacement as high as 5,000 IU /day is safe and necessary in many patients to treat vitamin D deficiency following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass yet is still suboptimal in others.

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KW - Vitamin D supplementation

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