Femtosecond laser propagation through aerosol clouds for improved communications and remote sensing applications

Dennis R Alexander, D. Doerr, Jianchao Li, Haifeng Zhang

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Optical communications and remote sensing applications have been limited by ability of the laser beam to penetrate aerosol clouds. Ultra short femtosecond laser pulses are now available for these applications. The fundamental question that must be answered is whether there is increased transmission through aerosols when a very short pulse is used. The basic idea is that there should be increased transmission because the electrons in matter can not respond to an instantaneous applied electromagnetic field and because the physical "bullet" of light is so short that the usual constructive and destructive interference will not add coherently. In this paper, results of research carried out with 9 fs pulses propagating through aerosol clouds of 1-4 urn in size are reported. The interaction of ultra short pulses with matter is starting to approach the time domain where the electrons in matter do not have time to interact with an instantaneously applied electromagnetic field. Experiments were carried out for transmission, through aerosol clouds contained in a tube, for 9 fs pulses and compared with those of continuous wave case. Results indicated that there was about a 0.5 % increase in the transmission. The magnitude of the increase was to be expected given that the phenomenon is just starting to turn on. Theoretical calculations indicate that for a free electron the time for the electron to follow an applied field is about 2.5-3 fs. In order to better understand the phenomena, additional experiments were conducted on fused silica glass, and on water contained in a cell.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages3880-3883
Number of pages4
StatePublished - Dec 1 2004
Event2004 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium Proceedings: Science for Society: Exploring and Managing a Changing Planet. IGARSS 2004 - Anchorage, AK, United States
Duration: Sep 20 2004Sep 24 2004

Conference

Conference2004 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium Proceedings: Science for Society: Exploring and Managing a Changing Planet. IGARSS 2004
CountryUnited States
CityAnchorage, AK
Period9/20/049/24/04

Fingerprint

volcanic cloud
Ultrashort pulses
Aerosols
Remote sensing
laser
communication
remote sensing
electron
Electrons
Communication
electromagnetic field
Fused silica
Electromagnetic fields
Optical communication
Laser beams
silica
experiment
glass
Experiments
aerosol

Keywords

  • Optical communications
  • Propagation through clouds
  • Ultrafast laser communications

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science Applications
  • Earth and Planetary Sciences(all)

Cite this

Alexander, D. R., Doerr, D., Li, J., & Zhang, H. (2004). Femtosecond laser propagation through aerosol clouds for improved communications and remote sensing applications. 3880-3883. Paper presented at 2004 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium Proceedings: Science for Society: Exploring and Managing a Changing Planet. IGARSS 2004, Anchorage, AK, United States.

Femtosecond laser propagation through aerosol clouds for improved communications and remote sensing applications. / Alexander, Dennis R; Doerr, D.; Li, Jianchao; Zhang, Haifeng.

2004. 3880-3883 Paper presented at 2004 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium Proceedings: Science for Society: Exploring and Managing a Changing Planet. IGARSS 2004, Anchorage, AK, United States.

Research output: Contribution to conferencePaper

Alexander, DR, Doerr, D, Li, J & Zhang, H 2004, 'Femtosecond laser propagation through aerosol clouds for improved communications and remote sensing applications' Paper presented at 2004 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium Proceedings: Science for Society: Exploring and Managing a Changing Planet. IGARSS 2004, Anchorage, AK, United States, 9/20/04 - 9/24/04, pp. 3880-3883.
Alexander DR, Doerr D, Li J, Zhang H. Femtosecond laser propagation through aerosol clouds for improved communications and remote sensing applications. 2004. Paper presented at 2004 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium Proceedings: Science for Society: Exploring and Managing a Changing Planet. IGARSS 2004, Anchorage, AK, United States.
Alexander, Dennis R ; Doerr, D. ; Li, Jianchao ; Zhang, Haifeng. / Femtosecond laser propagation through aerosol clouds for improved communications and remote sensing applications. Paper presented at 2004 IEEE International Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium Proceedings: Science for Society: Exploring and Managing a Changing Planet. IGARSS 2004, Anchorage, AK, United States.4 p.
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