Feeding Drosophila a biotin-deficient diet for multiple generations increases stress resistance and lifespan and alters gene expression and histone biotinylation patterns

Erin M. Smith, Jia Tse Hoi, Joel C. Eissenberg, James D. Shoemaker, Wendi S. Neckameyer, Anne M. Ilvarsonn, Lawrence G. Harshman, Vicki L Schlegel, Janos Zempleni

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

34 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Energy restriction increases stress resistance and lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster and other species. The roles of individual nutrients in stress resistance and longevity are largely unknown. The vitamin biotin is a potential candidate for mediating these effects, given its known roles in stress signaling and gene regulation by epigenetic mechanisms, i.e. biotinylation of histones. Here, we tested the hypothesis that prolonged culture of Drosophila on biotin-deficient (BD) medium increases stress resistance and lifespan. Flies were fed a BD diet for multiple generations; controls were fed a biotin-normal diet. In some experiments, a third group of flies was fed a BD diet for 12 generations and then switched to control diets for 2 generations to eliminate potential effects of short-term biotin deficiency. Flies fed a BD diet exhibited a 30% increase in lifespan. This increase was associated with enhanced resistance to the DNA-damaging agent hydroxyurea and heat stress. Also, fertility increased significantly compared with biotin-normal controls. Biotinylation of histones was barely detectable in biotin-deprived flies, suggesting that epigenetic events might have contributed to effects of biotin deprivation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2006-2012
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Nutrition
Volume137
Issue number9
StatePublished - Sep 1 2007

Fingerprint

biotinylation
Biotinylation
biotin
Biotin
histones
stress tolerance
Histones
Drosophila
Diet
Gene Expression
gene expression
diet
Diptera
Epigenomics
epigenetics
hydroxyurea
Hydroxyurea
Drosophila melanogaster
Vitamins
Fertility

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Food Science

Cite this

Feeding Drosophila a biotin-deficient diet for multiple generations increases stress resistance and lifespan and alters gene expression and histone biotinylation patterns. / Smith, Erin M.; Hoi, Jia Tse; Eissenberg, Joel C.; Shoemaker, James D.; Neckameyer, Wendi S.; Ilvarsonn, Anne M.; Harshman, Lawrence G.; Schlegel, Vicki L; Zempleni, Janos.

In: Journal of Nutrition, Vol. 137, No. 9, 01.09.2007, p. 2006-2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Smith, Erin M. ; Hoi, Jia Tse ; Eissenberg, Joel C. ; Shoemaker, James D. ; Neckameyer, Wendi S. ; Ilvarsonn, Anne M. ; Harshman, Lawrence G. ; Schlegel, Vicki L ; Zempleni, Janos. / Feeding Drosophila a biotin-deficient diet for multiple generations increases stress resistance and lifespan and alters gene expression and histone biotinylation patterns. In: Journal of Nutrition. 2007 ; Vol. 137, No. 9. pp. 2006-2012.
@article{7c6d44e3017b469f95a852345b9203fe,
title = "Feeding Drosophila a biotin-deficient diet for multiple generations increases stress resistance and lifespan and alters gene expression and histone biotinylation patterns",
abstract = "Energy restriction increases stress resistance and lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster and other species. The roles of individual nutrients in stress resistance and longevity are largely unknown. The vitamin biotin is a potential candidate for mediating these effects, given its known roles in stress signaling and gene regulation by epigenetic mechanisms, i.e. biotinylation of histones. Here, we tested the hypothesis that prolonged culture of Drosophila on biotin-deficient (BD) medium increases stress resistance and lifespan. Flies were fed a BD diet for multiple generations; controls were fed a biotin-normal diet. In some experiments, a third group of flies was fed a BD diet for 12 generations and then switched to control diets for 2 generations to eliminate potential effects of short-term biotin deficiency. Flies fed a BD diet exhibited a 30{\%} increase in lifespan. This increase was associated with enhanced resistance to the DNA-damaging agent hydroxyurea and heat stress. Also, fertility increased significantly compared with biotin-normal controls. Biotinylation of histones was barely detectable in biotin-deprived flies, suggesting that epigenetic events might have contributed to effects of biotin deprivation.",
author = "Smith, {Erin M.} and Hoi, {Jia Tse} and Eissenberg, {Joel C.} and Shoemaker, {James D.} and Neckameyer, {Wendi S.} and Ilvarsonn, {Anne M.} and Harshman, {Lawrence G.} and Schlegel, {Vicki L} and Janos Zempleni",
year = "2007",
month = "9",
day = "1",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "137",
pages = "2006--2012",
journal = "The Journal of nutrition",
issn = "0022-3166",
publisher = "American Society for Nutrition",
number = "9",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Feeding Drosophila a biotin-deficient diet for multiple generations increases stress resistance and lifespan and alters gene expression and histone biotinylation patterns

AU - Smith, Erin M.

AU - Hoi, Jia Tse

AU - Eissenberg, Joel C.

AU - Shoemaker, James D.

AU - Neckameyer, Wendi S.

AU - Ilvarsonn, Anne M.

AU - Harshman, Lawrence G.

AU - Schlegel, Vicki L

AU - Zempleni, Janos

PY - 2007/9/1

Y1 - 2007/9/1

N2 - Energy restriction increases stress resistance and lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster and other species. The roles of individual nutrients in stress resistance and longevity are largely unknown. The vitamin biotin is a potential candidate for mediating these effects, given its known roles in stress signaling and gene regulation by epigenetic mechanisms, i.e. biotinylation of histones. Here, we tested the hypothesis that prolonged culture of Drosophila on biotin-deficient (BD) medium increases stress resistance and lifespan. Flies were fed a BD diet for multiple generations; controls were fed a biotin-normal diet. In some experiments, a third group of flies was fed a BD diet for 12 generations and then switched to control diets for 2 generations to eliminate potential effects of short-term biotin deficiency. Flies fed a BD diet exhibited a 30% increase in lifespan. This increase was associated with enhanced resistance to the DNA-damaging agent hydroxyurea and heat stress. Also, fertility increased significantly compared with biotin-normal controls. Biotinylation of histones was barely detectable in biotin-deprived flies, suggesting that epigenetic events might have contributed to effects of biotin deprivation.

AB - Energy restriction increases stress resistance and lifespan in Drosophila melanogaster and other species. The roles of individual nutrients in stress resistance and longevity are largely unknown. The vitamin biotin is a potential candidate for mediating these effects, given its known roles in stress signaling and gene regulation by epigenetic mechanisms, i.e. biotinylation of histones. Here, we tested the hypothesis that prolonged culture of Drosophila on biotin-deficient (BD) medium increases stress resistance and lifespan. Flies were fed a BD diet for multiple generations; controls were fed a biotin-normal diet. In some experiments, a third group of flies was fed a BD diet for 12 generations and then switched to control diets for 2 generations to eliminate potential effects of short-term biotin deficiency. Flies fed a BD diet exhibited a 30% increase in lifespan. This increase was associated with enhanced resistance to the DNA-damaging agent hydroxyurea and heat stress. Also, fertility increased significantly compared with biotin-normal controls. Biotinylation of histones was barely detectable in biotin-deprived flies, suggesting that epigenetic events might have contributed to effects of biotin deprivation.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=34548410575&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=34548410575&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 137

SP - 2006

EP - 2012

JO - The Journal of nutrition

JF - The Journal of nutrition

SN - 0022-3166

IS - 9

ER -