Feasibility, acceptability, and usability of web-based data collection in parents of children with cancer

Kimberly A. Pyke-Grimm, Katherine P. Kelly, Janet L. Stewart, Jane L Meza

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose/ Objectives: To determine the feasibility of Web-based, multisite data collection using electronic instruments and the feasibility, acceptability, and usability of that data collection method to parents of children with cancer. Design: Prototype development and feasibility study. Setting: Three Children's Oncology Group centers in the United States. Sample: 20 parents of children with cancer who made a treatment decision within the previous six months. Methods: Eight instruments were translated from print to electronic format and deployed using a secure Web-based server. Parents completed printed versions of two of the instruments to assess comparability of the two formats. A post-survey interview focused on parents' computer experiences and the acceptability and ease of use of the instruments. Main Research Variables: Time to orient parent to Web site, time to complete instruments, investigators' field notes, and postsurvey questionnaire. Findings: Eighty percent of parents preferred the Web-based data collection and found it at least as easy as completing paper-and-pencil instruments. All parents, regardless of their computer expertise, were comfortable with the electronic data collection system. Statistical analysis demonstrated no evidence of systematic or clinically significant bias. Conclusions: The Web-based data collection was feasible, reliable, and preferred by most study participants. The authors will use this strategy in future intervention trials of parents making treatment decisions. Implications for Nursing: Web-based data entry is feasible and acceptable to parents of children with cancer. Future multicenter collaborative studies should develop and test nursing interventions to support parents making treatment decisions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)428-435
Number of pages8
JournalOncology nursing forum
Volume38
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2011

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Parents
Neoplasms
Decision Making
Nursing
Feasibility Studies
Information Systems
Multicenter Studies
Therapeutics
Research Personnel
Interviews
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology(nursing)

Cite this

Feasibility, acceptability, and usability of web-based data collection in parents of children with cancer. / Pyke-Grimm, Kimberly A.; Kelly, Katherine P.; Stewart, Janet L.; Meza, Jane L.

In: Oncology nursing forum, Vol. 38, No. 4, 01.07.2011, p. 428-435.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pyke-Grimm, Kimberly A. ; Kelly, Katherine P. ; Stewart, Janet L. ; Meza, Jane L. / Feasibility, acceptability, and usability of web-based data collection in parents of children with cancer. In: Oncology nursing forum. 2011 ; Vol. 38, No. 4. pp. 428-435.
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