Fate and transport of antimicrobials and antimicrobial resistance genes in soil and runoff following land application of swine manure slurry

Stacey R. Joy, Shannon L Bartelt-Hunt, Daniel D Snow, John E. Gilley, Bryan L. Woodbury, David B. Parker, David B. Marx, Xu Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

77 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Due to the use of antimicrobials in livestock production, residual antimicrobials and antimicrobial resistance genes (ARGs) could enter the environment following the land application of animal wastes and could further contaminate surface and groundwater. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of various manure land application methods on the fate and transport of antimicrobials and ARGs in soil and runoff following land application of swine manure slurry. Swine manure slurries were obtained from facilities housing pigs that were fed chlortetracyline, tylosin or bacitracin and were land applied via broadcast, incorporation, and injection methods. Three rainfall simulation tests were then performed on amended and control plots. Results show that land application methods had no statistically significant effect on the aqueous concentrations of antimicrobials in runoff. However, among the three application methods tested broadcast resulted in the highest total mass loading of antimicrobials in runoff from the three rainfall simulation tests. The aqueous concentrations of chlortetracyline and tylosin in runoff decreased in consecutive rainfall events, although the trend was only statistically significant for tylosin. For ARGs, broadcast resulted in significantly higher erm genes in runoff than did incorporation and injection methods. In soil, the effects of land application methods on the fate of antimicrobials in top soil were compound specific. No clear trend was observed in the ARG levels in soil, likely because different host cells may respond differently to the soil environments created by various land application methods.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)12081-12088
Number of pages8
JournalEnvironmental Science and Technology
Volume47
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 5 2013

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Manures
Runoff
slurry
manure
Genes
runoff
Soils
Tylosin
gene
soil
Rain
rainfall
soil by environment
Bacitracin
livestock farming
Slurries
method
land
pig
Agriculture

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Chemistry(all)
  • Environmental Chemistry

Cite this

Fate and transport of antimicrobials and antimicrobial resistance genes in soil and runoff following land application of swine manure slurry. / Joy, Stacey R.; Bartelt-Hunt, Shannon L; Snow, Daniel D; Gilley, John E.; Woodbury, Bryan L.; Parker, David B.; Marx, David B.; Li, Xu.

In: Environmental Science and Technology, Vol. 47, No. 21, 05.11.2013, p. 12081-12088.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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