Fast mappers, slow learners

Word learning without hippocampus is slow and sparse irrespective of methodology

David E Warren, Melissa C. Duff

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Rapid word learning without the hippocampus is an alluring prospect–it holds the promise of remediating a common learning deficit associated with aging (healthy or pathological) and certain neurological conditions. Despite recent reports indicating rapid, non-hippocampal word learning by amnesic adults after contrastive ‘fast-mapping’ exposure, several replications have failed. These failures stand in contrast to successful but slow learning by amnesic patients under other conditions, and this pattern suggests that rapid word learning in adulthood is hippocampus-dependent and relational irrespective of learning format. However, much remains to be studied, and important methodological and theoretical considerations are highlighted here.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)210-212
Number of pages3
JournalCognitive Neuroscience
Volume10
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2019

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Keywords

  • Fast mapping
  • amnesia
  • hippocampus
  • relational memory
  • word learning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cognitive Neuroscience

Cite this

Fast mappers, slow learners : Word learning without hippocampus is slow and sparse irrespective of methodology. / Warren, David E; Duff, Melissa C.

In: Cognitive Neuroscience, Vol. 10, No. 4, 01.01.2019, p. 210-212.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

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