Family, community, and school influences on resilience among American Indian adolescents in the upper Midwest

Teresa D. Lafromboise, Danny R Hoyt, Lisa Oliver, Leslie B Whitbeck

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

163 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This study examines resilience among a sample of American Indian adolescents living on or near reservations in the upper Midwest. Data are from a baseline survey of 212 youth (115 boys and 97 girls) who were enrolled in the fifth through eighth grades. Based upon the definition of resilience, latent class analyses were conducted to identify youth who displayed pro-social outcomes (60.5%) as opposed to problem behavior outcomes. A measure of family adversity was also developed that indicated only 38.4% of the youth lived in low-adversity households. Defining resilience in the context of positive outcomes in the face of adversity, logistic regression was used to examine the predictors of pro-social outcomes among youth who lived in moderate- to high-adversity households. The analyses identified key risk and protective factors. A primary risk factor appeared to be perceived discrimination. Protective factors were from multiple contexts: family, community, and culture. Having a warm and supportive mother, perceiving community support, and exhibiting higher levels of enculturation were each associated with increased likelihood of pro-social outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)193-209
Number of pages17
JournalJournal of Community Psychology
Volume34
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2006

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North American Indians
American Indian
resilience
adolescent
school
community
enculturation
discrimination
school grade
logistics
regression
Logistic Models
Mothers

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Psychology

Cite this

Family, community, and school influences on resilience among American Indian adolescents in the upper Midwest. / Lafromboise, Teresa D.; Hoyt, Danny R; Oliver, Lisa; Whitbeck, Leslie B.

In: Journal of Community Psychology, Vol. 34, No. 2, 01.03.2006, p. 193-209.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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