Family-Centered Positive Psychology

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Throughout the past several decades the economic and cultural conditions of the American family have changed dramatically. These changing family dynamics create challenges for service providers to work with families in a way that supports their healthy functioning and respects their values. The presence of multiple risk factors is generally understood to create discontinuities in interaction rules between home and community environments and contribute to challenges in assuring positive family functioning. Within this chapter, we discuss the characteristics of healthy children and families and how the parent-child relationship can serve as a protective factor for young children at risk. Family-centered positive psychology (FCPP) recognizes the family as a constant in the child's life and strives to support both child well-being and healthy family functioning. Throughout this chapter, families and children are discussed from a strengths-based approach that recognizes the assets and strengths present within the family rather than the deficits or limitations. Family-centered services (FCSs) are a framework for service delivery that is based on the principles of FCPP. In FCSs, service providers strive to create a context within which families may become empowered; assist family members to identify their unique needs and acquire skills and competencies; and identify social networks to promote positive outcomes for the child and family. In this chapter, we describe the primary principles of family-centered care, discuss implications for practice, describe one model of family-centered care that illustrates FCS in practice, and discuss future research directions for FCPP.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Oxford Handbook of Positive Psychology, (2 Ed.)
PublisherOxford University Press
ISBN (Electronic)9780199940615
ISBN (Print)9780195187243
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 18 2012

Fingerprint

Psychology
Parent-Child Relations
Family Relations
Child Welfare
Social Support
Economics

Keywords

  • Child well-being
  • Conjoint behavioral consultation
  • Family-centered services
  • Parent-child relationship
  • Positive psychology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychology(all)

Cite this

Sheridan, S. M., & Burt, J. D. (2012). Family-Centered Positive Psychology. In The Oxford Handbook of Positive Psychology, (2 Ed.) Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195187243.013.0052

Family-Centered Positive Psychology. / Sheridan, Susan M; Burt, Jennifer D.

The Oxford Handbook of Positive Psychology, (2 Ed.). Oxford University Press, 2012.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Sheridan, SM & Burt, JD 2012, Family-Centered Positive Psychology. in The Oxford Handbook of Positive Psychology, (2 Ed.). Oxford University Press. https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195187243.013.0052
Sheridan SM, Burt JD. Family-Centered Positive Psychology. In The Oxford Handbook of Positive Psychology, (2 Ed.). Oxford University Press. 2012 https://doi.org/10.1093/oxfordhb/9780195187243.013.0052
Sheridan, Susan M ; Burt, Jennifer D. / Family-Centered Positive Psychology. The Oxford Handbook of Positive Psychology, (2 Ed.). Oxford University Press, 2012.
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