False recognition without intentional learning

Michael D. Dodd, Colin M. MacLeod

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Asked to memorize a list of semantically related words, participants often falsely recall or recognize a highly related semantic associate that has not been presented (the critical lure). Does this false memory phenomenon depend on intentional word reading and learning? In Experiment 1, participants performed a color identification task on distractor words from typical false memory lists. In Experiment 2, participants read the same words. In both experiments, the primary task was followed by a surprise recognition test for actually presented and unpresented words, including the critical lures. False alarms to critical lures were robust and quite equivalent across the two experiments. These results are consistent with an activation/monitoring account of false memory, in which processing of semantic associates can evoke false memories even when that processing is incidental.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)137-142
Number of pages6
JournalPsychonomic Bulletin and Review
Volume11
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 2004

Fingerprint

Learning
Semantics
Reading
Color
Recognition (Psychology)
False Memory
False Recognition
Experiment
Distractor
Word Learning
Word Reading
Surprise
Monitoring
Associates
Activation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Experimental and Cognitive Psychology
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)

Cite this

False recognition without intentional learning. / Dodd, Michael D.; MacLeod, Colin M.

In: Psychonomic Bulletin and Review, Vol. 11, No. 1, 02.2004, p. 137-142.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dodd, Michael D. ; MacLeod, Colin M. / False recognition without intentional learning. In: Psychonomic Bulletin and Review. 2004 ; Vol. 11, No. 1. pp. 137-142.
@article{0f26875bc2394c279aff9e4485f4b2af,
title = "False recognition without intentional learning",
abstract = "Asked to memorize a list of semantically related words, participants often falsely recall or recognize a highly related semantic associate that has not been presented (the critical lure). Does this false memory phenomenon depend on intentional word reading and learning? In Experiment 1, participants performed a color identification task on distractor words from typical false memory lists. In Experiment 2, participants read the same words. In both experiments, the primary task was followed by a surprise recognition test for actually presented and unpresented words, including the critical lures. False alarms to critical lures were robust and quite equivalent across the two experiments. These results are consistent with an activation/monitoring account of false memory, in which processing of semantic associates can evoke false memories even when that processing is incidental.",
author = "Dodd, {Michael D.} and MacLeod, {Colin M.}",
year = "2004",
month = "2",
doi = "10.3758/BF03206473",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "11",
pages = "137--142",
journal = "Psychonomic Bulletin and Review",
issn = "1069-9384",
publisher = "Springer New York",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - False recognition without intentional learning

AU - Dodd, Michael D.

AU - MacLeod, Colin M.

PY - 2004/2

Y1 - 2004/2

N2 - Asked to memorize a list of semantically related words, participants often falsely recall or recognize a highly related semantic associate that has not been presented (the critical lure). Does this false memory phenomenon depend on intentional word reading and learning? In Experiment 1, participants performed a color identification task on distractor words from typical false memory lists. In Experiment 2, participants read the same words. In both experiments, the primary task was followed by a surprise recognition test for actually presented and unpresented words, including the critical lures. False alarms to critical lures were robust and quite equivalent across the two experiments. These results are consistent with an activation/monitoring account of false memory, in which processing of semantic associates can evoke false memories even when that processing is incidental.

AB - Asked to memorize a list of semantically related words, participants often falsely recall or recognize a highly related semantic associate that has not been presented (the critical lure). Does this false memory phenomenon depend on intentional word reading and learning? In Experiment 1, participants performed a color identification task on distractor words from typical false memory lists. In Experiment 2, participants read the same words. In both experiments, the primary task was followed by a surprise recognition test for actually presented and unpresented words, including the critical lures. False alarms to critical lures were robust and quite equivalent across the two experiments. These results are consistent with an activation/monitoring account of false memory, in which processing of semantic associates can evoke false memories even when that processing is incidental.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=2442425265&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=2442425265&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3758/BF03206473

DO - 10.3758/BF03206473

M3 - Article

C2 - 15116999

AN - SCOPUS:2442425265

VL - 11

SP - 137

EP - 142

JO - Psychonomic Bulletin and Review

JF - Psychonomic Bulletin and Review

SN - 1069-9384

IS - 1

ER -