False confessions: The role of police deception in interrogation and jurors' perceptions of the techniques and their outcomes

William Douglas Woody, Krista D. Forrest, Joshua M. Stewart

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Our chapter explores police deception during interrogation with emphasis on false-evidence ploys and jurors perceptions of false-evidence ploys. We discuss the current literature on false confessions in response to police deception, and then we review ethical, legal, and constitutional questions related to police deception. Next, we extend these ideas into an important area of emerging scholarship: jurors perceptions of police deception. As the triers of fact in most criminal trials, jurors must decide verdicts in the context of each case, and, once a judge has admitted a confession into a trial, jurors must decide the defendants guilt in light of his or her confession. Can jurors rise to these legal expectations We review recent and ongoing research on jurors perceptions of false-evidence ploys and conclude with recommendations for police interrogators, attorneys, legislators, and scholars.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationCrime
Subtitle of host publicationCauses, Types and Victims
PublisherNova Science Publishers, Inc.
Pages1-35
Number of pages35
ISBN (Print)9781617289316
StatePublished - Dec 1 2011

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police
evidence
guilt

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Social Sciences(all)

Cite this

Woody, W. D., Forrest, K. D., & Stewart, J. M. (2011). False confessions: The role of police deception in interrogation and jurors' perceptions of the techniques and their outcomes. In Crime: Causes, Types and Victims (pp. 1-35). Nova Science Publishers, Inc..

False confessions : The role of police deception in interrogation and jurors' perceptions of the techniques and their outcomes. / Woody, William Douglas; Forrest, Krista D.; Stewart, Joshua M.

Crime: Causes, Types and Victims. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2011. p. 1-35.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Woody, WD, Forrest, KD & Stewart, JM 2011, False confessions: The role of police deception in interrogation and jurors' perceptions of the techniques and their outcomes. in Crime: Causes, Types and Victims. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., pp. 1-35.
Woody WD, Forrest KD, Stewart JM. False confessions: The role of police deception in interrogation and jurors' perceptions of the techniques and their outcomes. In Crime: Causes, Types and Victims. Nova Science Publishers, Inc. 2011. p. 1-35
Woody, William Douglas ; Forrest, Krista D. ; Stewart, Joshua M. / False confessions : The role of police deception in interrogation and jurors' perceptions of the techniques and their outcomes. Crime: Causes, Types and Victims. Nova Science Publishers, Inc., 2011. pp. 1-35
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