Falls in the audiology clinic: A pilot study

Robin E. Criter, Julie A. Honaker

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Falls are a common and often preventable cause of injury and death among older adults. Hearing loss, vestibular disorders, dizziness, and imbalance are common risk factors for falls; however, the rate of falls among older audiology patients has never been assessed. Purpose: To examine the fall history and risk factors of older adults seen in a university audiology clinic. Research Design: A descriptive and correlational retrospective chart review of fall history and characteristics of patients seen in a university audiology clinic. Study Sample: 88 (51 women, 37 men) patients aged 60 yr and older seen in a university audiology clinic. Data Collection and Analysis: At the time of hearing evaluation, clinic patients filled out the Activities-Specific Balance Confidence (ABC) Scale, as well as a history form containing fall-related questions. These measures, as well as demographic information (gender and age) were retrieved during a retrospective chart review. Data were analyzed with independent-samples t-tests, Pearson correlations, and descriptive statistics. Results: Fifty percent of the study sample reported falling within the preceding 12 mo, while 70% reported having fallen at some point in the past. ABC Scale score was negatively correlated with age and number of recent falls. Conclusions: There appears to be a higher prevalence of falls within a university audiology clinic relative to previously published fall rates in the general population.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1001-1005
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of the American Academy of Audiology
Volume24
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2013

Fingerprint

Audiology
History
Dizziness
Hearing Loss
Hearing
Cause of Death
Research Design
Demography
Wounds and Injuries
Population

Keywords

  • Aged
  • Audiology
  • Risk of falls

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Speech and Hearing

Cite this

Falls in the audiology clinic : A pilot study. / Criter, Robin E.; Honaker, Julie A.

In: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology, Vol. 24, No. 10, 01.11.2013, p. 1001-1005.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Criter, Robin E. ; Honaker, Julie A. / Falls in the audiology clinic : A pilot study. In: Journal of the American Academy of Audiology. 2013 ; Vol. 24, No. 10. pp. 1001-1005.
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