Factors affecting frequency discrimination in school-aged children and adults

Crystal N. Taylor, Emily Buss, Lori J Leibold

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

Abstract

Auditory frequency discrimination is a basic ability that may limit the maturation of speech and language skills in some listeners. Despite its importance, the factors affecting frequency discrimination in school-aged children are poorly understood. The goal of the present study was to evaluate effects related to memory for pitch, musical training, and the utilization of temporal fine-structure cues. Listeners were normal-hearing children, 5.1 to 13.6 years old, and adults. One subgroup of children had musical training (>150 hours) and the other did not. The standard stimulus was either a 500- or a 5000-Hz pure tone, and the target stimulus was either a tone of higher frequency or a frequency-modulated tone (2- or 20-Hz rate) centered on the standard frequency. As commonly observed, mean frequency discrimination thresholds tended to be elevated in younger listeners. This developmental effect was smaller for FM detection than for pure-tone frequency discrimination, consistent with an effect of memory for pitch. The child/adult difference tended to be smaller for musically trained than untrained children. Children were not particularly poor at 2-Hz FM detection for the 500-Hz standard, a condition thought to rely on temporal fine-structure cues.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number050059
JournalProceedings of Meetings on Acoustics
Volume19
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 19 2013
Event21st International Congress on Acoustics, ICA 2013 - 165th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America - Montreal, QC, Canada
Duration: Jun 2 2013Jun 7 2013

Fingerprint

discrimination
Data storage equipment
Frequency standards
Audition
cues
stimuli
frequency modulation
education
fine structure
Cues
frequency standards
hearing
subgroups
Aptitude
Hearing
Discrimination (Psychology)
Language
thresholds

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

Factors affecting frequency discrimination in school-aged children and adults. / Taylor, Crystal N.; Buss, Emily; Leibold, Lori J.

In: Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics, Vol. 19, 050059, 19.06.2013.

Research output: Contribution to journalConference article

@article{5a5e8b9e39bf47538c55a59c1221cff0,
title = "Factors affecting frequency discrimination in school-aged children and adults",
abstract = "Auditory frequency discrimination is a basic ability that may limit the maturation of speech and language skills in some listeners. Despite its importance, the factors affecting frequency discrimination in school-aged children are poorly understood. The goal of the present study was to evaluate effects related to memory for pitch, musical training, and the utilization of temporal fine-structure cues. Listeners were normal-hearing children, 5.1 to 13.6 years old, and adults. One subgroup of children had musical training (>150 hours) and the other did not. The standard stimulus was either a 500- or a 5000-Hz pure tone, and the target stimulus was either a tone of higher frequency or a frequency-modulated tone (2- or 20-Hz rate) centered on the standard frequency. As commonly observed, mean frequency discrimination thresholds tended to be elevated in younger listeners. This developmental effect was smaller for FM detection than for pure-tone frequency discrimination, consistent with an effect of memory for pitch. The child/adult difference tended to be smaller for musically trained than untrained children. Children were not particularly poor at 2-Hz FM detection for the 500-Hz standard, a condition thought to rely on temporal fine-structure cues.",
author = "Taylor, {Crystal N.} and Emily Buss and Leibold, {Lori J}",
year = "2013",
month = "6",
day = "19",
doi = "10.1121/1.4798810",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "19",
journal = "Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics",
issn = "1939-800X",
publisher = "Acoustical Society of America",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Factors affecting frequency discrimination in school-aged children and adults

AU - Taylor, Crystal N.

AU - Buss, Emily

AU - Leibold, Lori J

PY - 2013/6/19

Y1 - 2013/6/19

N2 - Auditory frequency discrimination is a basic ability that may limit the maturation of speech and language skills in some listeners. Despite its importance, the factors affecting frequency discrimination in school-aged children are poorly understood. The goal of the present study was to evaluate effects related to memory for pitch, musical training, and the utilization of temporal fine-structure cues. Listeners were normal-hearing children, 5.1 to 13.6 years old, and adults. One subgroup of children had musical training (>150 hours) and the other did not. The standard stimulus was either a 500- or a 5000-Hz pure tone, and the target stimulus was either a tone of higher frequency or a frequency-modulated tone (2- or 20-Hz rate) centered on the standard frequency. As commonly observed, mean frequency discrimination thresholds tended to be elevated in younger listeners. This developmental effect was smaller for FM detection than for pure-tone frequency discrimination, consistent with an effect of memory for pitch. The child/adult difference tended to be smaller for musically trained than untrained children. Children were not particularly poor at 2-Hz FM detection for the 500-Hz standard, a condition thought to rely on temporal fine-structure cues.

AB - Auditory frequency discrimination is a basic ability that may limit the maturation of speech and language skills in some listeners. Despite its importance, the factors affecting frequency discrimination in school-aged children are poorly understood. The goal of the present study was to evaluate effects related to memory for pitch, musical training, and the utilization of temporal fine-structure cues. Listeners were normal-hearing children, 5.1 to 13.6 years old, and adults. One subgroup of children had musical training (>150 hours) and the other did not. The standard stimulus was either a 500- or a 5000-Hz pure tone, and the target stimulus was either a tone of higher frequency or a frequency-modulated tone (2- or 20-Hz rate) centered on the standard frequency. As commonly observed, mean frequency discrimination thresholds tended to be elevated in younger listeners. This developmental effect was smaller for FM detection than for pure-tone frequency discrimination, consistent with an effect of memory for pitch. The child/adult difference tended to be smaller for musically trained than untrained children. Children were not particularly poor at 2-Hz FM detection for the 500-Hz standard, a condition thought to rely on temporal fine-structure cues.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84878995245&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84878995245&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1121/1.4798810

DO - 10.1121/1.4798810

M3 - Conference article

VL - 19

JO - Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics

JF - Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics

SN - 1939-800X

M1 - 050059

ER -