Fabrication and characterization of surface texture for bone ingrowth by sequential laser peening biodegradable orthopedic magnesium-calcium implants

M. P. Sealy, Y. B. Guo

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Biodegradable magnesium-calcium (Mg-Ca) implants have the ability to gradually dissolve and absorb into the human body after implantation. The similar mechanical properties to bone indicate that Mg-Ca is an ideal implant material to minimize the negative effects of stress shielding. Furthermore, using a biodegradable Mg-Ca implant prevents the need for a secondary removal surgery that commonly occurs with permanent metallic implants. The critical issue that hinders the application of Mg-Ca implants is the poor corrosion resistance to human body fluids. The corrosion process adversely affects bone ingrowth that is critical for recovery. Therefore, sequential laser shock peening (LSP) of a biodegradable Mg-Ca alloy was initiated to create a superior surface topography for improving implant performance. LSP is an innovative treatment to fabricate functional patterns on the surface of an implant. A patterned surface promotes bone ingrowth by providing a rough surface texture. Also, LSP imparts deep compressive residual stresses below the surface, which could potentially slow corrosion rates. Unique surface topographies were fabricated by changing the laser power and peening overlap ratio. The resultant effects on surface topography were investigated. Sequential peening at higher overlap ratios (75%) was found to reduce the tensile pileup region by over 40% as well as compress the overall surface by as much as 35 μm.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number011003
JournalJournal of Medical Devices, Transactions of the ASME
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 3 2011

Fingerprint

Shot peening
Orthopedics
Magnesium
Calcium
Bone
Lasers
Textures
Corrosion
Bone and Bones
Fabrication
Surface topography
Shock
Human Body
Calcium alloys
Body fluids
Body Fluids
Magnesium alloys
Corrosion rate
Compressive stress
Shielding

Keywords

  • Biodegradable implant
  • Laser shock peening
  • Magnesium-calcium
  • Surface patterning

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Biomedical Engineering

Cite this

@article{d84edf5cde5344949fdb4d14e81f844b,
title = "Fabrication and characterization of surface texture for bone ingrowth by sequential laser peening biodegradable orthopedic magnesium-calcium implants",
abstract = "Biodegradable magnesium-calcium (Mg-Ca) implants have the ability to gradually dissolve and absorb into the human body after implantation. The similar mechanical properties to bone indicate that Mg-Ca is an ideal implant material to minimize the negative effects of stress shielding. Furthermore, using a biodegradable Mg-Ca implant prevents the need for a secondary removal surgery that commonly occurs with permanent metallic implants. The critical issue that hinders the application of Mg-Ca implants is the poor corrosion resistance to human body fluids. The corrosion process adversely affects bone ingrowth that is critical for recovery. Therefore, sequential laser shock peening (LSP) of a biodegradable Mg-Ca alloy was initiated to create a superior surface topography for improving implant performance. LSP is an innovative treatment to fabricate functional patterns on the surface of an implant. A patterned surface promotes bone ingrowth by providing a rough surface texture. Also, LSP imparts deep compressive residual stresses below the surface, which could potentially slow corrosion rates. Unique surface topographies were fabricated by changing the laser power and peening overlap ratio. The resultant effects on surface topography were investigated. Sequential peening at higher overlap ratios (75{\%}) was found to reduce the tensile pileup region by over 40{\%} as well as compress the overall surface by as much as 35 μm.",
keywords = "Biodegradable implant, Laser shock peening, Magnesium-calcium, Surface patterning",
author = "Sealy, {M. P.} and Guo, {Y. B.}",
year = "2011",
month = "2",
day = "3",
doi = "10.1115/1.4003117",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "5",
journal = "Journal of Medical Devices, Transactions of the ASME",
issn = "1932-6181",
publisher = "American Society of Mechanical Engineers(ASME)",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fabrication and characterization of surface texture for bone ingrowth by sequential laser peening biodegradable orthopedic magnesium-calcium implants

AU - Sealy, M. P.

AU - Guo, Y. B.

PY - 2011/2/3

Y1 - 2011/2/3

N2 - Biodegradable magnesium-calcium (Mg-Ca) implants have the ability to gradually dissolve and absorb into the human body after implantation. The similar mechanical properties to bone indicate that Mg-Ca is an ideal implant material to minimize the negative effects of stress shielding. Furthermore, using a biodegradable Mg-Ca implant prevents the need for a secondary removal surgery that commonly occurs with permanent metallic implants. The critical issue that hinders the application of Mg-Ca implants is the poor corrosion resistance to human body fluids. The corrosion process adversely affects bone ingrowth that is critical for recovery. Therefore, sequential laser shock peening (LSP) of a biodegradable Mg-Ca alloy was initiated to create a superior surface topography for improving implant performance. LSP is an innovative treatment to fabricate functional patterns on the surface of an implant. A patterned surface promotes bone ingrowth by providing a rough surface texture. Also, LSP imparts deep compressive residual stresses below the surface, which could potentially slow corrosion rates. Unique surface topographies were fabricated by changing the laser power and peening overlap ratio. The resultant effects on surface topography were investigated. Sequential peening at higher overlap ratios (75%) was found to reduce the tensile pileup region by over 40% as well as compress the overall surface by as much as 35 μm.

AB - Biodegradable magnesium-calcium (Mg-Ca) implants have the ability to gradually dissolve and absorb into the human body after implantation. The similar mechanical properties to bone indicate that Mg-Ca is an ideal implant material to minimize the negative effects of stress shielding. Furthermore, using a biodegradable Mg-Ca implant prevents the need for a secondary removal surgery that commonly occurs with permanent metallic implants. The critical issue that hinders the application of Mg-Ca implants is the poor corrosion resistance to human body fluids. The corrosion process adversely affects bone ingrowth that is critical for recovery. Therefore, sequential laser shock peening (LSP) of a biodegradable Mg-Ca alloy was initiated to create a superior surface topography for improving implant performance. LSP is an innovative treatment to fabricate functional patterns on the surface of an implant. A patterned surface promotes bone ingrowth by providing a rough surface texture. Also, LSP imparts deep compressive residual stresses below the surface, which could potentially slow corrosion rates. Unique surface topographies were fabricated by changing the laser power and peening overlap ratio. The resultant effects on surface topography were investigated. Sequential peening at higher overlap ratios (75%) was found to reduce the tensile pileup region by over 40% as well as compress the overall surface by as much as 35 μm.

KW - Biodegradable implant

KW - Laser shock peening

KW - Magnesium-calcium

KW - Surface patterning

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=79551527611&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=79551527611&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1115/1.4003117

DO - 10.1115/1.4003117

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:79551527611

VL - 5

JO - Journal of Medical Devices, Transactions of the ASME

JF - Journal of Medical Devices, Transactions of the ASME

SN - 1932-6181

IS - 1

M1 - 011003

ER -