Extent of occupational hand use among persons with rheumatoid arthritis

Saralynn Allaire, Frederick Wolfe, Jingbo Niu, Nancy Baker, Kaleb Michaud, Michael Lavalley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective. Occupational hand use is increasing due to increased computer use and could place persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) at risk for work disability. Although hand involvement in RA is typical, there is little information about occupational hand use in relation to RA. Study objectives were to describe the extent of occupational hand use by persons with RA; the types of jobs that require extensive hand use; the relationship between occupational hand use and joint pain; and the extent of occupational hand use among persons with shorter versus longer disease duration. Methods. Cross-sectional survey data from 2,761 employed participants with RA from a US national cohort were used. Extent of occupational hand use was measured by the hand-use item from a job physical demand scale used in prior RA studies. Analyses included descriptive statistics and chi-square tests. Results. The mean age was 50.6 years, 78.5% were women, 91.8% were white, and 68.8% had more than a high school education. Eighty-three percent of participants reported extensive occupational hand use. Large portions of participants in all types of jobs reported extensive hand use, 92% with administrative support jobs and 69% with operator/laborer jobs. Participants with extensive occupational hand use were more likely to have hand joint pain than those with moderate hand use (66% versus 58%; P = 0.004). Extensive hand use did not vary by disease duration (83% and 84% in participants with ≤15 and >15 years' duration, respectively). Conclusion. Extensive occupational hand use was ubiquitous among employed persons with RA and was associated with greater hand pain.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)294-299
Number of pages6
JournalArthritis Care and Research
Volume55
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 15 2006

Fingerprint

Rheumatoid Arthritis
Hand
Hand Joints
Arthralgia
Chi-Square Distribution
Cross-Sectional Studies
Education
Pain

Keywords

  • Hand function
  • Occupation
  • Rheumatoid arthritis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Rheumatology

Cite this

Extent of occupational hand use among persons with rheumatoid arthritis. / Allaire, Saralynn; Wolfe, Frederick; Niu, Jingbo; Baker, Nancy; Michaud, Kaleb; Lavalley, Michael.

In: Arthritis Care and Research, Vol. 55, No. 2, 15.04.2006, p. 294-299.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Allaire, Saralynn ; Wolfe, Frederick ; Niu, Jingbo ; Baker, Nancy ; Michaud, Kaleb ; Lavalley, Michael. / Extent of occupational hand use among persons with rheumatoid arthritis. In: Arthritis Care and Research. 2006 ; Vol. 55, No. 2. pp. 294-299.
@article{00e73b7ce9c440d88e98c32b2bb1e77f,
title = "Extent of occupational hand use among persons with rheumatoid arthritis",
abstract = "Objective. Occupational hand use is increasing due to increased computer use and could place persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) at risk for work disability. Although hand involvement in RA is typical, there is little information about occupational hand use in relation to RA. Study objectives were to describe the extent of occupational hand use by persons with RA; the types of jobs that require extensive hand use; the relationship between occupational hand use and joint pain; and the extent of occupational hand use among persons with shorter versus longer disease duration. Methods. Cross-sectional survey data from 2,761 employed participants with RA from a US national cohort were used. Extent of occupational hand use was measured by the hand-use item from a job physical demand scale used in prior RA studies. Analyses included descriptive statistics and chi-square tests. Results. The mean age was 50.6 years, 78.5{\%} were women, 91.8{\%} were white, and 68.8{\%} had more than a high school education. Eighty-three percent of participants reported extensive occupational hand use. Large portions of participants in all types of jobs reported extensive hand use, 92{\%} with administrative support jobs and 69{\%} with operator/laborer jobs. Participants with extensive occupational hand use were more likely to have hand joint pain than those with moderate hand use (66{\%} versus 58{\%}; P = 0.004). Extensive hand use did not vary by disease duration (83{\%} and 84{\%} in participants with ≤15 and >15 years' duration, respectively). Conclusion. Extensive occupational hand use was ubiquitous among employed persons with RA and was associated with greater hand pain.",
keywords = "Hand function, Occupation, Rheumatoid arthritis",
author = "Saralynn Allaire and Frederick Wolfe and Jingbo Niu and Nancy Baker and Kaleb Michaud and Michael Lavalley",
year = "2006",
month = "4",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1002/art.21839",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "55",
pages = "294--299",
journal = "Arthritis and Rheumatism",
issn = "2151-4658",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Extent of occupational hand use among persons with rheumatoid arthritis

AU - Allaire, Saralynn

AU - Wolfe, Frederick

AU - Niu, Jingbo

AU - Baker, Nancy

AU - Michaud, Kaleb

AU - Lavalley, Michael

PY - 2006/4/15

Y1 - 2006/4/15

N2 - Objective. Occupational hand use is increasing due to increased computer use and could place persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) at risk for work disability. Although hand involvement in RA is typical, there is little information about occupational hand use in relation to RA. Study objectives were to describe the extent of occupational hand use by persons with RA; the types of jobs that require extensive hand use; the relationship between occupational hand use and joint pain; and the extent of occupational hand use among persons with shorter versus longer disease duration. Methods. Cross-sectional survey data from 2,761 employed participants with RA from a US national cohort were used. Extent of occupational hand use was measured by the hand-use item from a job physical demand scale used in prior RA studies. Analyses included descriptive statistics and chi-square tests. Results. The mean age was 50.6 years, 78.5% were women, 91.8% were white, and 68.8% had more than a high school education. Eighty-three percent of participants reported extensive occupational hand use. Large portions of participants in all types of jobs reported extensive hand use, 92% with administrative support jobs and 69% with operator/laborer jobs. Participants with extensive occupational hand use were more likely to have hand joint pain than those with moderate hand use (66% versus 58%; P = 0.004). Extensive hand use did not vary by disease duration (83% and 84% in participants with ≤15 and >15 years' duration, respectively). Conclusion. Extensive occupational hand use was ubiquitous among employed persons with RA and was associated with greater hand pain.

AB - Objective. Occupational hand use is increasing due to increased computer use and could place persons with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) at risk for work disability. Although hand involvement in RA is typical, there is little information about occupational hand use in relation to RA. Study objectives were to describe the extent of occupational hand use by persons with RA; the types of jobs that require extensive hand use; the relationship between occupational hand use and joint pain; and the extent of occupational hand use among persons with shorter versus longer disease duration. Methods. Cross-sectional survey data from 2,761 employed participants with RA from a US national cohort were used. Extent of occupational hand use was measured by the hand-use item from a job physical demand scale used in prior RA studies. Analyses included descriptive statistics and chi-square tests. Results. The mean age was 50.6 years, 78.5% were women, 91.8% were white, and 68.8% had more than a high school education. Eighty-three percent of participants reported extensive occupational hand use. Large portions of participants in all types of jobs reported extensive hand use, 92% with administrative support jobs and 69% with operator/laborer jobs. Participants with extensive occupational hand use were more likely to have hand joint pain than those with moderate hand use (66% versus 58%; P = 0.004). Extensive hand use did not vary by disease duration (83% and 84% in participants with ≤15 and >15 years' duration, respectively). Conclusion. Extensive occupational hand use was ubiquitous among employed persons with RA and was associated with greater hand pain.

KW - Hand function

KW - Occupation

KW - Rheumatoid arthritis

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=33645924374&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=33645924374&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1002/art.21839

DO - 10.1002/art.21839

M3 - Article

C2 - 16583427

AN - SCOPUS:33645924374

VL - 55

SP - 294

EP - 299

JO - Arthritis and Rheumatism

JF - Arthritis and Rheumatism

SN - 2151-4658

IS - 2

ER -