Exploring links between publishing performance in different levels of marketing journals: Around the world and in the Asia-Pacific region

Michael Polonsky, Les Carlson

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine relationships in publishing performance by utilizing data from three sets of journals – A∗, A, and B ranked – as defined by the Australian Government's Excellence in Research rankings in Australia. Comparisons in publishing performance across these three types of journals are examined for academics around the globe, as well as for those in the AsiaPacific region. Design/methodology/approach – The study involves a content analysis of the authors' details from those who published in eight journals between 1998 and 2007. Correlation analysis is then used to identify pairwise relationships in publishing across the three sets of journals, which is also supported by regression analysis. Findings – The findings suggest that there is a positive publishing performance relationship for A and B journals when compared on a global basis as well as within AsiaPacific. There is also a positive relationship between publishing in the A∗ and A journals, but only for the global sample and not for academics within AsiaPacific. Globally, a regression analysis identified that A∗ are positively impacted by A publications, but negatively affected by B journals, with a positive interaction for A and B publications. The interaction suggests that for universities with low levels of A's, there is a significant difference in regard to B publications' impact on A∗. The regression focusing on universities within the AsiaPacific was insignificant in terms of how A and B publications impact on A∗ output. Originality/value – The research is valuable in understanding that there are some synergies in publishing between research areas, although they are less extensive within the AsiaPacific. It is also valuable in light of the upcoming Excellence in Research for Australia exercise in Australia, which focuses on comparing research performance between institutions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)7-22
Number of pages16
JournalAsia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics
Volume23
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 11 2011

Fingerprint

Asia-Pacific region
Marketing
Asia-Pacific
Regression analysis
Interaction
Excellence
Exercise
Synergy
Content analysis
Research performance
Correlation analysis
Globe
Government
Design methodology
Ranking

Keywords

  • Australia
  • Marketing theory
  • Performance management
  • Publishing
  • Serials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Business and International Management
  • Strategy and Management
  • Marketing

Cite this

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title = "Exploring links between publishing performance in different levels of marketing journals: Around the world and in the Asia-Pacific region",
abstract = "Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine relationships in publishing performance by utilizing data from three sets of journals – A∗, A, and B ranked – as defined by the Australian Government's Excellence in Research rankings in Australia. Comparisons in publishing performance across these three types of journals are examined for academics around the globe, as well as for those in the AsiaPacific region. Design/methodology/approach – The study involves a content analysis of the authors' details from those who published in eight journals between 1998 and 2007. Correlation analysis is then used to identify pairwise relationships in publishing across the three sets of journals, which is also supported by regression analysis. Findings – The findings suggest that there is a positive publishing performance relationship for A and B journals when compared on a global basis as well as within AsiaPacific. There is also a positive relationship between publishing in the A∗ and A journals, but only for the global sample and not for academics within AsiaPacific. Globally, a regression analysis identified that A∗ are positively impacted by A publications, but negatively affected by B journals, with a positive interaction for A and B publications. The interaction suggests that for universities with low levels of A's, there is a significant difference in regard to B publications' impact on A∗. The regression focusing on universities within the AsiaPacific was insignificant in terms of how A and B publications impact on A∗ output. Originality/value – The research is valuable in understanding that there are some synergies in publishing between research areas, although they are less extensive within the AsiaPacific. It is also valuable in light of the upcoming Excellence in Research for Australia exercise in Australia, which focuses on comparing research performance between institutions.",
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