Expert consensus document: The International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) consensus statement on the definition and scope of prebiotics

Glenn R. Gibson, Robert Hutkins, Mary Ellen Sanders, Susan L. Prescott, Raylene A. Reimer, Seppo J. Salminen, Karen Scott, Catherine Stanton, Kelly S. Swanson, Patrice D. Cani, Kristin Verbeke, Gregor Reid

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

409 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In December 2016, a panel of experts in microbiology, nutrition and clinical research was convened by the International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics to review the definition and scope of prebiotics. Consistent with the original embodiment of prebiotics, but aware of the latest scientific and clinical developments, the panel updated the definition of a prebiotic: A substrate that is selectively utilized by host microorganisms conferring a health benefit. This definition expands the concept of prebiotics to possibly include non-carbohydrate substances, applications to body sites other than the gastrointestinal tract, and diverse categories other than food. The requirement for selective microbiota-mediated mechanisms was retained. Beneficial health effects must be documented for a substance to be considered a prebiotic. The consensus definition applies also to prebiotics for use by animals, in which microbiota-focused strategies to maintain health and prevent disease is as relevant as for humans. Ultimately, the goal of this Consensus Statement is to engender appropriate use of the term 'prebiotic' by relevant stakeholders so that consistency and clarity can be achieved in research reports, product marketing and regulatory oversight of the category. To this end, we have reviewed several aspects of prebiotic science including its development, health benefits and legislation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)491-502
Number of pages12
JournalNature Reviews Gastroenterology and Hepatology
Volume14
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2017

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Prebiotics
Probiotics
Microbiota
Insurance Benefits
Health
Microbiology
Marketing
Legislation
Gastrointestinal Tract
Food

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology
  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Expert consensus document : The International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) consensus statement on the definition and scope of prebiotics. / Gibson, Glenn R.; Hutkins, Robert; Sanders, Mary Ellen; Prescott, Susan L.; Reimer, Raylene A.; Salminen, Seppo J.; Scott, Karen; Stanton, Catherine; Swanson, Kelly S.; Cani, Patrice D.; Verbeke, Kristin; Reid, Gregor.

In: Nature Reviews Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Vol. 14, No. 8, 01.08.2017, p. 491-502.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Gibson, Glenn R. ; Hutkins, Robert ; Sanders, Mary Ellen ; Prescott, Susan L. ; Reimer, Raylene A. ; Salminen, Seppo J. ; Scott, Karen ; Stanton, Catherine ; Swanson, Kelly S. ; Cani, Patrice D. ; Verbeke, Kristin ; Reid, Gregor. / Expert consensus document : The International Scientific Association for Probiotics and Prebiotics (ISAPP) consensus statement on the definition and scope of prebiotics. In: Nature Reviews Gastroenterology and Hepatology. 2017 ; Vol. 14, No. 8. pp. 491-502.
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