Expanding the enablement framework and testing an evaluative instrument for diabetes patient education

Lynnette Leeseberg Stamler, Mary M. Cole, Linda J. Patrick

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background. Strategies to delay or prevent complications from diabetes include diabetes patient education. Diabetes educators seek to provide education that meets the needs of clients and influences positive health outcomes. Aims. (1) To expand prior research exploring an enablement framework for patient education by examining perceptions of patient education by persons with diabetes and (2) to test the mastery of stress instrument (MSI) as a potential evaluative instrument for patient education. Method. Triangulated data collection with a convenience sample of adults taking diabetes education classes. Half the sample completed audio-taped semi-structured interviews pre, during and posteducation and all completed the MSI posteducation. Qualitative data were analysed using latent content analysis, descriptive statistics were completed. Results. Qualitative analysis revealed content categories similar to previous work with prenatal participants, supporting the enablement framework. Statistical analyses noted congruence with psychometric findings from development of MSI; secondary qualitative analyses revealed congruency between MSI scores and patient perceptions. Conclusions. Mastery is an outcome congruent with the enablement framework for patient education across content areas. Mastery of stress instrument may be a instrument for identification of patients who are coping well with diabetes self-management, as well as those who are not and who require further nursing interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)365-372
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of advanced nursing
Volume35
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2001

Fingerprint

Patient Education
Education
Diabetes Complications
Self Care
Exercise Test
Psychometrics
Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus
Nursing
Interviews
Health
Research

Keywords

  • Diabetes
  • Enablement
  • Mastery
  • Mastery of stress instrument
  • Patient education
  • Triangulated

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nursing(all)

Cite this

Expanding the enablement framework and testing an evaluative instrument for diabetes patient education. / Stamler, Lynnette Leeseberg; Cole, Mary M.; Patrick, Linda J.

In: Journal of advanced nursing, Vol. 35, No. 3, 01.08.2001, p. 365-372.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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