Expanding child behavior management technology in pediatric dentistry

a behavioral science perspective.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

35 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Changing attitudes on the part of dentists and parents alike have resulted in increasing interest by dentists to develop additional child behavior management techniques. Collaborative research between dentists and behavioral psychologists has been encouraged by the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry (AAPD) to address these concerns, but additional research is needed. This paper describes three techniques that, from a behavioral science perspective, offer promise for pediatric dentists managing disruptive children. In addition to scientific appeal, these techniques appear to have potential for acceptance and incorporation into the dental operatory. Although early research suggests these procedures can fit easily into routine practice, are time and cost efficient, and are relatively easy to learn, additional research is needed to clearly establish their external validity, cost efficiency, and ease of implementation. The discussion focuses on issues relevant to incorporating new technology into the dental school curriculum and disseminating it to practicing dentists.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)13-17
Number of pages5
JournalPediatric dentistry
Volume16
Issue number1
StatePublished - Jan 1 1994

Fingerprint

Pediatric Dentistry
Behavioral Sciences
Child Behavior
Dentists
Technology
Research
Costs and Cost Analysis
Dental Schools
Curriculum
Tooth
Parents
Psychology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Expanding child behavior management technology in pediatric dentistry : a behavioral science perspective. / Kuhn, Brett R; Allen, Keith D.

In: Pediatric dentistry, Vol. 16, No. 1, 01.01.1994, p. 13-17.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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