Exogenous and endogenous nitric oxide but not iNOS inhibition improves function and survival of ischemically injured livers

F. A. Rivera-Chavez, L. H. Toledo-Pereyra, R. E. Dean, L. Crouch, P. A. Ward

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

26 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The role of nitric oxide (NO) in liver ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury remains controversial and few works have shed more information regarding the effect of exogenous (EX) and/or endogenous NO (EN) under conditions of I/R of the liver. We investigated the role of exogenous and endogenous NO and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibition in liver function, neutrophil infiltration, and animal survival after liver I/R. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to total hepatic ischemia for 90 min using an extracorporeal porto-systemic shunt. The animals were divided into five groups, including the sham porto-systemic shunt with no ischemia, the control ischemic group, the L-arginine-treated group, the sodium nitroprusside (SNP or NaNP)-treated group, and the L-N6-(1-iminoethyl) lysine hydrochloride (L-NIL) (selective iNOS inhibitor)-treated group. The animal survival was followed for 7 days. Liver injury tests, tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO), and histology were analyzed at 6 h postreperfusion. L-Arginine- and sodium nitroprusside-treated groups demonstrated significant improvement in 7 days survival in comparison to the control (20%) (p < .05). The best overall survival was obtained with SNP (70%), followed by survival in the L-arginine treated group (60%). The iNOS inhibitor group (40%) did not show any statistical significance when compared to the control group (p > .05). Liver injury tests and histology scores in the SNP- and L-arginine-treated groups showed significant improvement when compared to the control group (p < .01 and p < .05, respectively). The iNOS group demonstrated only a slight improvement in these parameters. The liver MPO (as a measurement of neutrophil migration into the liver parenchyma) was significantly decreased only in the SNP and L-arginine groups (p < .05) but not in the iNOS group (p > .5). We conclude that NO exogenous donors and substrates for the endogenous pathway are beneficial for the liver after severe I/R and could be important therapeutic targets to prevent damage following this phenomenon.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)267-273
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Investigative Surgery
Volume14
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 20 2001

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Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II
Nitric Oxide
Liver
Ischemia
Arginine
Nitroprusside
Reperfusion
Single Nucleotide Polymorphism
Histology
Control Groups
Nitric Oxide Donors
Neutrophil Infiltration
Wounds and Injuries
Reperfusion Injury
Peroxidase
Lysine
Sprague Dawley Rats

Keywords

  • L-arginine
  • Liver ischemia and reperfusion
  • Nitric oxide
  • Sodium nitroprusside
  • iNOS selective inhibitor

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Exogenous and endogenous nitric oxide but not iNOS inhibition improves function and survival of ischemically injured livers. / Rivera-Chavez, F. A.; Toledo-Pereyra, L. H.; Dean, R. E.; Crouch, L.; Ward, P. A.

In: Journal of Investigative Surgery, Vol. 14, No. 5, 20.11.2001, p. 267-273.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rivera-Chavez, F. A. ; Toledo-Pereyra, L. H. ; Dean, R. E. ; Crouch, L. ; Ward, P. A. / Exogenous and endogenous nitric oxide but not iNOS inhibition improves function and survival of ischemically injured livers. In: Journal of Investigative Surgery. 2001 ; Vol. 14, No. 5. pp. 267-273.
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AU - Toledo-Pereyra, L. H.

AU - Dean, R. E.

AU - Crouch, L.

AU - Ward, P. A.

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N2 - The role of nitric oxide (NO) in liver ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury remains controversial and few works have shed more information regarding the effect of exogenous (EX) and/or endogenous NO (EN) under conditions of I/R of the liver. We investigated the role of exogenous and endogenous NO and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibition in liver function, neutrophil infiltration, and animal survival after liver I/R. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to total hepatic ischemia for 90 min using an extracorporeal porto-systemic shunt. The animals were divided into five groups, including the sham porto-systemic shunt with no ischemia, the control ischemic group, the L-arginine-treated group, the sodium nitroprusside (SNP or NaNP)-treated group, and the L-N6-(1-iminoethyl) lysine hydrochloride (L-NIL) (selective iNOS inhibitor)-treated group. The animal survival was followed for 7 days. Liver injury tests, tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO), and histology were analyzed at 6 h postreperfusion. L-Arginine- and sodium nitroprusside-treated groups demonstrated significant improvement in 7 days survival in comparison to the control (20%) (p < .05). The best overall survival was obtained with SNP (70%), followed by survival in the L-arginine treated group (60%). The iNOS inhibitor group (40%) did not show any statistical significance when compared to the control group (p > .05). Liver injury tests and histology scores in the SNP- and L-arginine-treated groups showed significant improvement when compared to the control group (p < .01 and p < .05, respectively). The iNOS group demonstrated only a slight improvement in these parameters. The liver MPO (as a measurement of neutrophil migration into the liver parenchyma) was significantly decreased only in the SNP and L-arginine groups (p < .05) but not in the iNOS group (p > .5). We conclude that NO exogenous donors and substrates for the endogenous pathway are beneficial for the liver after severe I/R and could be important therapeutic targets to prevent damage following this phenomenon.

AB - The role of nitric oxide (NO) in liver ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) injury remains controversial and few works have shed more information regarding the effect of exogenous (EX) and/or endogenous NO (EN) under conditions of I/R of the liver. We investigated the role of exogenous and endogenous NO and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibition in liver function, neutrophil infiltration, and animal survival after liver I/R. Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to total hepatic ischemia for 90 min using an extracorporeal porto-systemic shunt. The animals were divided into five groups, including the sham porto-systemic shunt with no ischemia, the control ischemic group, the L-arginine-treated group, the sodium nitroprusside (SNP or NaNP)-treated group, and the L-N6-(1-iminoethyl) lysine hydrochloride (L-NIL) (selective iNOS inhibitor)-treated group. The animal survival was followed for 7 days. Liver injury tests, tissue myeloperoxidase (MPO), and histology were analyzed at 6 h postreperfusion. L-Arginine- and sodium nitroprusside-treated groups demonstrated significant improvement in 7 days survival in comparison to the control (20%) (p < .05). The best overall survival was obtained with SNP (70%), followed by survival in the L-arginine treated group (60%). The iNOS inhibitor group (40%) did not show any statistical significance when compared to the control group (p > .05). Liver injury tests and histology scores in the SNP- and L-arginine-treated groups showed significant improvement when compared to the control group (p < .01 and p < .05, respectively). The iNOS group demonstrated only a slight improvement in these parameters. The liver MPO (as a measurement of neutrophil migration into the liver parenchyma) was significantly decreased only in the SNP and L-arginine groups (p < .05) but not in the iNOS group (p > .5). We conclude that NO exogenous donors and substrates for the endogenous pathway are beneficial for the liver after severe I/R and could be important therapeutic targets to prevent damage following this phenomenon.

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