Abstract

The role, if any, of exercise training in the management of individuals with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is unclear. Anecdotally, patients have reported improvement in symptoms with regular participation in an exercise regime. In this study, we evaluated the effects of an exercise training program and weight loss on physical and subjective measures associated with OSAS. Nine subjects with mild to moderate OSAS completed a six month supervised exercise program. Pre and post-training measures on polysomnographic testing, physical training, anthropometric measures, quality of life (QOL), daytime somnolence and mood states were assessed. A significant decrease in the AHI (p=0.002) was noted along with improvements (p<0.05) in total sleep time, sleep efficiency, number of awakenings/hour, arousals/hour, apnea index and mean exercise training workloads. Significant decreases (p<.001) in weight (-6.2 kg) and body mass index (-1.6) were observed. Evaluation of QOL measures by the Health Status Questionnaire, Profile of Mood States and Epworth Sleepiness Scale showed significant changes in health status, affective state, and a decrease in daytime somnolence. Regular exercise training had a positive impact on the AHI, aerobic capacity, body mass index and QOL. However, exercise training alone was not an adequate intervention strategy for most individuals with OSAS but may serve well as an adjunct treatment strategy in the conservative management of individuals with mild to moderate OSAS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)121-129
Number of pages9
JournalSleep research online : SRO
Volume3
Issue number3
StatePublished - 2000

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Obstructive Sleep Apnea
Exercise
Quality of Life
Health Status
Sleep
Body Mass Index
Apnea
Arousal
Workload
Weight Loss
Education
Weights and Measures

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology

Cite this

Exercise training effect on obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. / Norman, Joseph F; Von Essen, Susanna G; Fuchs, Robert Hall; McElligott, M.

In: Sleep research online : SRO, Vol. 3, No. 3, 2000, p. 121-129.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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