Examining the utility of behavioral health integration in well-child visits: Implications for rural settings

Jennifer D. Burt, S. Andrew Garbacz, Kevin A. Kupzyk, Lynae Frerichs, Rebecca Gathje

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of integrating behavioral health services into well-child visits in underserved, remote, and/or fringe areas. Specifically, the following were examined: the structure of the well-child visit for standard care in comparison to when a behavioral health provider was integrated into the visit and the effect of integrating a behavioral health provider on behavioral health topics covered and parent satisfaction. Participants were 94 caregivers of children attending well-child visits. Group differences were examined for participants in well-child visits with a behavioral health provider and participants in a standard well-child visit. Findings suggest a statistically significant increase in caregiver-rated perception for the number of topics covered with the integration of a behavioral health provider in the well-child visits. No significant effects of caregiver-rated helpfulness or satisfaction were observed. Implications for the findings and future research directions are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)20-30
Number of pages11
JournalFamilies, Systems and Health
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2014

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Keywords

  • Anticipatory guidance
  • Child development
  • Integrated behavioral health care
  • Well-child visits

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Examining the utility of behavioral health integration in well-child visits : Implications for rural settings. / Burt, Jennifer D.; Garbacz, S. Andrew; Kupzyk, Kevin A.; Frerichs, Lynae; Gathje, Rebecca.

In: Families, Systems and Health, Vol. 32, No. 1, 03.2014, p. 20-30.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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