Examining the relationship between personality characteristics and worker's attention under fall and tripping hazard conditions

Sogand Hasanzadeh, Behzad Esmaeili, Michael D. Dodd

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

A worker's attentional and cognitive failures - such as lack of attention, failure to identify a tripping hazard, or misperception about a hazard's risks - can lead to unsafe behaviors and, consequently, accidents. Previous literature has shown that individual characteristics such as personality may affect human's selective attention. However, few studies have attempted to empirically examine how a worker's personality affects attention and situation awareness on a jobsite. The present study examines how workers' emotional stability (neuroticism) affects their cognitive failures (especially attentional failure) when they are exposed to fall-to-same-level hazardous conditions. To achieve this goal - and given that eye movements represent the most direct manifestation of visual attention - the personalities of construction workers were assessed via self-completion questionnaires, and their attention and situation awareness were monitored continuously and in real-time using a mobile wearable eye-tracking apparatus. Correlational analyses revealed the significant relationship between neuroticism and the attentional distribution of workers. These results suggest that workers do not allocate their attention equally to all hazardous areas and these differences in attentional distribution are modulated by personality characteristics (neuroticism). A more detailed investigation of this connection yielded a specific pattern: Less neurotic workers periodically look down and scan ahead to obtain feedforward information about tripping hazards, and these individuals remain fully aware of the environment and its associated hazards. The findings of this study suggest the value assessing personality to identify workers who are more likely to be involved in accidents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationConstruction Research Congress 2018
Subtitle of host publicationSafety and Disaster Management - Selected Papers from the Construction Research Congress 2018
EditorsChristofer Harper, Yongcheol Lee, Rebecca Harris, Charles Berryman, Chao Wang
PublisherAmerican Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)
Pages412-422
Number of pages11
ISBN (Electronic)9780784481288
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018
EventConstruction Research Congress 2018: Safety and Disaster Management, CRC 2018 - New Orleans, United States
Duration: Apr 2 2018Apr 4 2018

Publication series

NameConstruction Research Congress 2018: Safety and Disaster Management - Selected Papers from the Construction Research Congress 2018
Volume2018-April

Other

OtherConstruction Research Congress 2018: Safety and Disaster Management, CRC 2018
CountryUnited States
CityNew Orleans
Period4/2/184/4/18

Fingerprint

Hazards
Accidents
Eye movements

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Civil and Structural Engineering
  • Building and Construction

Cite this

Hasanzadeh, S., Esmaeili, B., & Dodd, M. D. (2018). Examining the relationship between personality characteristics and worker's attention under fall and tripping hazard conditions. In C. Harper, Y. Lee, R. Harris, C. Berryman, & C. Wang (Eds.), Construction Research Congress 2018: Safety and Disaster Management - Selected Papers from the Construction Research Congress 2018 (pp. 412-422). (Construction Research Congress 2018: Safety and Disaster Management - Selected Papers from the Construction Research Congress 2018; Vol. 2018-April). American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784481288.040

Examining the relationship between personality characteristics and worker's attention under fall and tripping hazard conditions. / Hasanzadeh, Sogand; Esmaeili, Behzad; Dodd, Michael D.

Construction Research Congress 2018: Safety and Disaster Management - Selected Papers from the Construction Research Congress 2018. ed. / Christofer Harper; Yongcheol Lee; Rebecca Harris; Charles Berryman; Chao Wang. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2018. p. 412-422 (Construction Research Congress 2018: Safety and Disaster Management - Selected Papers from the Construction Research Congress 2018; Vol. 2018-April).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Hasanzadeh, S, Esmaeili, B & Dodd, MD 2018, Examining the relationship between personality characteristics and worker's attention under fall and tripping hazard conditions. in C Harper, Y Lee, R Harris, C Berryman & C Wang (eds), Construction Research Congress 2018: Safety and Disaster Management - Selected Papers from the Construction Research Congress 2018. Construction Research Congress 2018: Safety and Disaster Management - Selected Papers from the Construction Research Congress 2018, vol. 2018-April, American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), pp. 412-422, Construction Research Congress 2018: Safety and Disaster Management, CRC 2018, New Orleans, United States, 4/2/18. https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784481288.040
Hasanzadeh S, Esmaeili B, Dodd MD. Examining the relationship between personality characteristics and worker's attention under fall and tripping hazard conditions. In Harper C, Lee Y, Harris R, Berryman C, Wang C, editors, Construction Research Congress 2018: Safety and Disaster Management - Selected Papers from the Construction Research Congress 2018. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE). 2018. p. 412-422. (Construction Research Congress 2018: Safety and Disaster Management - Selected Papers from the Construction Research Congress 2018). https://doi.org/10.1061/9780784481288.040
Hasanzadeh, Sogand ; Esmaeili, Behzad ; Dodd, Michael D. / Examining the relationship between personality characteristics and worker's attention under fall and tripping hazard conditions. Construction Research Congress 2018: Safety and Disaster Management - Selected Papers from the Construction Research Congress 2018. editor / Christofer Harper ; Yongcheol Lee ; Rebecca Harris ; Charles Berryman ; Chao Wang. American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE), 2018. pp. 412-422 (Construction Research Congress 2018: Safety and Disaster Management - Selected Papers from the Construction Research Congress 2018).
@inproceedings{66f513f43cba445ca3772936842559c7,
title = "Examining the relationship between personality characteristics and worker's attention under fall and tripping hazard conditions",
abstract = "A worker's attentional and cognitive failures - such as lack of attention, failure to identify a tripping hazard, or misperception about a hazard's risks - can lead to unsafe behaviors and, consequently, accidents. Previous literature has shown that individual characteristics such as personality may affect human's selective attention. However, few studies have attempted to empirically examine how a worker's personality affects attention and situation awareness on a jobsite. The present study examines how workers' emotional stability (neuroticism) affects their cognitive failures (especially attentional failure) when they are exposed to fall-to-same-level hazardous conditions. To achieve this goal - and given that eye movements represent the most direct manifestation of visual attention - the personalities of construction workers were assessed via self-completion questionnaires, and their attention and situation awareness were monitored continuously and in real-time using a mobile wearable eye-tracking apparatus. Correlational analyses revealed the significant relationship between neuroticism and the attentional distribution of workers. These results suggest that workers do not allocate their attention equally to all hazardous areas and these differences in attentional distribution are modulated by personality characteristics (neuroticism). A more detailed investigation of this connection yielded a specific pattern: Less neurotic workers periodically look down and scan ahead to obtain feedforward information about tripping hazards, and these individuals remain fully aware of the environment and its associated hazards. The findings of this study suggest the value assessing personality to identify workers who are more likely to be involved in accidents.",
author = "Sogand Hasanzadeh and Behzad Esmaeili and Dodd, {Michael D.}",
year = "2018",
month = "1",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1061/9780784481288.040",
language = "English (US)",
series = "Construction Research Congress 2018: Safety and Disaster Management - Selected Papers from the Construction Research Congress 2018",
publisher = "American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)",
pages = "412--422",
editor = "Christofer Harper and Yongcheol Lee and Rebecca Harris and Charles Berryman and Chao Wang",
booktitle = "Construction Research Congress 2018",

}

TY - GEN

T1 - Examining the relationship between personality characteristics and worker's attention under fall and tripping hazard conditions

AU - Hasanzadeh, Sogand

AU - Esmaeili, Behzad

AU - Dodd, Michael D.

PY - 2018/1/1

Y1 - 2018/1/1

N2 - A worker's attentional and cognitive failures - such as lack of attention, failure to identify a tripping hazard, or misperception about a hazard's risks - can lead to unsafe behaviors and, consequently, accidents. Previous literature has shown that individual characteristics such as personality may affect human's selective attention. However, few studies have attempted to empirically examine how a worker's personality affects attention and situation awareness on a jobsite. The present study examines how workers' emotional stability (neuroticism) affects their cognitive failures (especially attentional failure) when they are exposed to fall-to-same-level hazardous conditions. To achieve this goal - and given that eye movements represent the most direct manifestation of visual attention - the personalities of construction workers were assessed via self-completion questionnaires, and their attention and situation awareness were monitored continuously and in real-time using a mobile wearable eye-tracking apparatus. Correlational analyses revealed the significant relationship between neuroticism and the attentional distribution of workers. These results suggest that workers do not allocate their attention equally to all hazardous areas and these differences in attentional distribution are modulated by personality characteristics (neuroticism). A more detailed investigation of this connection yielded a specific pattern: Less neurotic workers periodically look down and scan ahead to obtain feedforward information about tripping hazards, and these individuals remain fully aware of the environment and its associated hazards. The findings of this study suggest the value assessing personality to identify workers who are more likely to be involved in accidents.

AB - A worker's attentional and cognitive failures - such as lack of attention, failure to identify a tripping hazard, or misperception about a hazard's risks - can lead to unsafe behaviors and, consequently, accidents. Previous literature has shown that individual characteristics such as personality may affect human's selective attention. However, few studies have attempted to empirically examine how a worker's personality affects attention and situation awareness on a jobsite. The present study examines how workers' emotional stability (neuroticism) affects their cognitive failures (especially attentional failure) when they are exposed to fall-to-same-level hazardous conditions. To achieve this goal - and given that eye movements represent the most direct manifestation of visual attention - the personalities of construction workers were assessed via self-completion questionnaires, and their attention and situation awareness were monitored continuously and in real-time using a mobile wearable eye-tracking apparatus. Correlational analyses revealed the significant relationship between neuroticism and the attentional distribution of workers. These results suggest that workers do not allocate their attention equally to all hazardous areas and these differences in attentional distribution are modulated by personality characteristics (neuroticism). A more detailed investigation of this connection yielded a specific pattern: Less neurotic workers periodically look down and scan ahead to obtain feedforward information about tripping hazards, and these individuals remain fully aware of the environment and its associated hazards. The findings of this study suggest the value assessing personality to identify workers who are more likely to be involved in accidents.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85048618919&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85048618919&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1061/9780784481288.040

DO - 10.1061/9780784481288.040

M3 - Conference contribution

AN - SCOPUS:85048618919

T3 - Construction Research Congress 2018: Safety and Disaster Management - Selected Papers from the Construction Research Congress 2018

SP - 412

EP - 422

BT - Construction Research Congress 2018

A2 - Harper, Christofer

A2 - Lee, Yongcheol

A2 - Harris, Rebecca

A2 - Berryman, Charles

A2 - Wang, Chao

PB - American Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)

ER -