Examining the impact of computational creativity exercises on college computer science students' learning, achievement, self-efficacy, and creativity

Markeya S. Peteranetz, Shiyuan Wang, Duane F. Shell, Abraham E. Flanigan, Leen-Kiat Soh

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The purpose of the present study was to investigate how the inclusion of computational creativity exercises (CCEs) merging computational and creative thinking in undergraduate computer science (CS) courses affected students' course grades, learning of core CS knowledge, self-efficacy, and creative competency. CCEs were done in lower- and upper-division CS courses at a single university. Students in CCE implementation courses were compared to students in the same courses in different semesters. Propensity score matching was used to create comparable groups (control and implementation) based on students' GPA, motivation, and engagement. Results showed that implementing CCEs in undergraduate CS courses enhanced grades, learning of core CS knowledge, and self-efficacy for creatively applying CS knowledge. However, CCEs did not impact creative competency. The effect of the CCEs was consistent across upper- and lowerdivision courses for all outcomes. Unlike previous studies that only established the support for CCEs, such as positive dosage effects, the results of this study indicate that CCEs have a causal effect on students' achievement, learning, and self-efficacy, and this effect is independent of general academic achievement, motivation, and engagement. These findings establish the CCEs as a validated, evidence-based instructional method.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationSIGCSE 2018 - Proceedings of the 49th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education
PublisherAssociation for Computing Machinery, Inc
Pages155-160
Number of pages6
Volume2018-January
ISBN (Electronic)9781450351034
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 21 2018
Event49th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, SIGCSE 2018 - Baltimore, United States
Duration: Feb 21 2018Feb 24 2018

Other

Other49th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, SIGCSE 2018
CountryUnited States
CityBaltimore
Period2/21/182/24/18

Fingerprint

computer science
Computer science
self-efficacy
creativity
Students
learning
student
Merging
achievement motivation
academic achievement
semester
inclusion
university
evidence

Keywords

  • Computational creativity
  • Computational thinking
  • Computer science education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Science(all)
  • Education

Cite this

Peteranetz, M. S., Wang, S., Shell, D. F., Flanigan, A. E., & Soh, L-K. (2018). Examining the impact of computational creativity exercises on college computer science students' learning, achievement, self-efficacy, and creativity. In SIGCSE 2018 - Proceedings of the 49th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education (Vol. 2018-January, pp. 155-160). Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. https://doi.org/10.1145/3159450.3159459

Examining the impact of computational creativity exercises on college computer science students' learning, achievement, self-efficacy, and creativity. / Peteranetz, Markeya S.; Wang, Shiyuan; Shell, Duane F.; Flanigan, Abraham E.; Soh, Leen-Kiat.

SIGCSE 2018 - Proceedings of the 49th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education. Vol. 2018-January Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, 2018. p. 155-160.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Peteranetz, MS, Wang, S, Shell, DF, Flanigan, AE & Soh, L-K 2018, Examining the impact of computational creativity exercises on college computer science students' learning, achievement, self-efficacy, and creativity. in SIGCSE 2018 - Proceedings of the 49th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education. vol. 2018-January, Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, pp. 155-160, 49th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education, SIGCSE 2018, Baltimore, United States, 2/21/18. https://doi.org/10.1145/3159450.3159459
Peteranetz MS, Wang S, Shell DF, Flanigan AE, Soh L-K. Examining the impact of computational creativity exercises on college computer science students' learning, achievement, self-efficacy, and creativity. In SIGCSE 2018 - Proceedings of the 49th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education. Vol. 2018-January. Association for Computing Machinery, Inc. 2018. p. 155-160 https://doi.org/10.1145/3159450.3159459
Peteranetz, Markeya S. ; Wang, Shiyuan ; Shell, Duane F. ; Flanigan, Abraham E. ; Soh, Leen-Kiat. / Examining the impact of computational creativity exercises on college computer science students' learning, achievement, self-efficacy, and creativity. SIGCSE 2018 - Proceedings of the 49th ACM Technical Symposium on Computer Science Education. Vol. 2018-January Association for Computing Machinery, Inc, 2018. pp. 155-160
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