Examining dimensions of self-efficacy for writing

Roger Bruning, Michael Dempsey, Douglas F. Kauffman, Courtney McKim, Sharon Zumbrunn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

73 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A multifactor perspective on writing self-efficacy was examined in 2 studies. Three factors were proposed-self-efficacy for writing ideation, writing conventions, and writing self-regulation-and a scale constructed to reflect these factors. In Study 1, middle school students (N = 697) completed the Self-Efficacy for Writing Scale (SEWS), along with associated measures. Confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) showed SEWS data fit the proposed 3-factor model well. In Study 2, a second CFA of data from 563 students from 2 high schools likewise showed good model fit. Scores based on the 3 writing self-efficacy factors were examined in relation to students' liking writing, self-reported writing grades, and statewide writing assessment (SWA) scores. Results showed writing ideation and self-regulation self-efficacy to be significantly more strongly related to liking writing than conventions self-efficacy but less related than conventions self-efficacy to SWA scores. All 3 writing self-efficacy dimensions showed moderate positive correlations with self-reported writing performance. Further analyses showed higher levels for all 3 dimensions of writing self-efficacy for students in more advanced English/language arts classes. Overall, results from the studies were interpreted as supporting multifactor models of writing self-efficacy and the utility of closer ties between self-efficacy measures and domains being assessed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)25-38
Number of pages14
JournalJournal of Educational Psychology
Volume105
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 7 2013

Fingerprint

Self Efficacy
self-efficacy
Students
self-regulation
Statistical Factor Analysis
factor analysis
Language Arts
student

Keywords

  • Conventions
  • Ideation
  • Self-efficacy
  • Self-regulation
  • Writing

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Education
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology

Cite this

Bruning, R., Dempsey, M., Kauffman, D. F., McKim, C., & Zumbrunn, S. (2013). Examining dimensions of self-efficacy for writing. Journal of Educational Psychology, 105(1), 25-38. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0029692

Examining dimensions of self-efficacy for writing. / Bruning, Roger; Dempsey, Michael; Kauffman, Douglas F.; McKim, Courtney; Zumbrunn, Sharon.

In: Journal of Educational Psychology, Vol. 105, No. 1, 07.08.2013, p. 25-38.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bruning, R, Dempsey, M, Kauffman, DF, McKim, C & Zumbrunn, S 2013, 'Examining dimensions of self-efficacy for writing', Journal of Educational Psychology, vol. 105, no. 1, pp. 25-38. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0029692
Bruning R, Dempsey M, Kauffman DF, McKim C, Zumbrunn S. Examining dimensions of self-efficacy for writing. Journal of Educational Psychology. 2013 Aug 7;105(1):25-38. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0029692
Bruning, Roger ; Dempsey, Michael ; Kauffman, Douglas F. ; McKim, Courtney ; Zumbrunn, Sharon. / Examining dimensions of self-efficacy for writing. In: Journal of Educational Psychology. 2013 ; Vol. 105, No. 1. pp. 25-38.
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