Evolution of bio-socially inspired strategies in support of dynamic spectrum access

Mohammad Abu Shattal, Ala Al-Fuqaha, Bilal Khan, Kirk Dombrowski, Anna Wisniewska

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Human and animal societies exhibit complex cognitive and social processes of coordination, cooperation, and competition among their members. Among other functions, these processes can facilitate fairer sharing of resources among community members and enhance individual survival outcomes. In this work, three bio-socially inspired models for secondary users of spectrum in cognitive radio networks are defined and compared to one other within an evolutionary framework. The proposed models reflect successively more sophisticated capabilities of secondary users in distributed spectrum access. The simplest of the three, blind channel access, is shown to be evolutionarily dominant when residual channel capacities are homogeneous. The second more advanced model assumes a capability to sense channel utilization; this model is shown to dominate when the channels have intermediate load and heterogeneous capacities. Finally, the most complex model (additionally) allows for social coalitions and within-group deference; this model is seen to dominate in high load heterogeneous resource settings. We explore the long term evolutionary pressures within societies whose members choose between these three schemes, with natural selection operating via a utility-based fitness function. Our research is based on systematic ns-3 simulation experiments of heterogeneous societies under a range of assumed channel conditions, population sizes, resource demands, and initial user attributes. Our results demonstrate that the secondary user population always evolves to adopt a unique and stable strategy, but that the winning strategy selected depends strongly on channel conditions. Our results further show that this kind of leaderless evolution leads to a significant 12-116% overall improvement in performance compared to systems in which a fixed strategy is deployed. In summary, we conclude that evolving bio-social behavioral models can be applied to great advantage in understanding dynamic environments such as those envisioned by distributed spectrum access.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication2017 IEEE International Conference on Communications Workshops, ICC Workshops 2017
EditorsConstantinos B. Papadias, Abbas Jamalipour
PublisherInstitute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.
Pages289-295
Number of pages7
ISBN (Electronic)9781509015252
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 29 2017
Event2017 IEEE International Conference on Communications Workshops, ICC Workshops 2017 - Paris, France
Duration: May 21 2017May 25 2017

Publication series

Name2017 IEEE International Conference on Communications Workshops, ICC Workshops 2017

Other

Other2017 IEEE International Conference on Communications Workshops, ICC Workshops 2017
CountryFrance
CityParis
Period5/21/175/25/17

Fingerprint

Channel capacity
Cognitive radio
Animals
Experiments

Keywords

  • Bio-Social Spectrum Access Strategies
  • Cognitive Radio
  • Dynamic Spectrum Access
  • Strategy Evolution

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Computer Networks and Communications
  • Hardware and Architecture

Cite this

Shattal, M. A., Al-Fuqaha, A., Khan, B., Dombrowski, K., & Wisniewska, A. (2017). Evolution of bio-socially inspired strategies in support of dynamic spectrum access. In C. B. Papadias, & A. Jamalipour (Eds.), 2017 IEEE International Conference on Communications Workshops, ICC Workshops 2017 (pp. 289-295). [7962672] (2017 IEEE International Conference on Communications Workshops, ICC Workshops 2017). Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc.. https://doi.org/10.1109/ICCW.2017.7962672

Evolution of bio-socially inspired strategies in support of dynamic spectrum access. / Shattal, Mohammad Abu; Al-Fuqaha, Ala; Khan, Bilal; Dombrowski, Kirk; Wisniewska, Anna.

2017 IEEE International Conference on Communications Workshops, ICC Workshops 2017. ed. / Constantinos B. Papadias; Abbas Jamalipour. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2017. p. 289-295 7962672 (2017 IEEE International Conference on Communications Workshops, ICC Workshops 2017).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Shattal, MA, Al-Fuqaha, A, Khan, B, Dombrowski, K & Wisniewska, A 2017, Evolution of bio-socially inspired strategies in support of dynamic spectrum access. in CB Papadias & A Jamalipour (eds), 2017 IEEE International Conference on Communications Workshops, ICC Workshops 2017., 7962672, 2017 IEEE International Conference on Communications Workshops, ICC Workshops 2017, Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., pp. 289-295, 2017 IEEE International Conference on Communications Workshops, ICC Workshops 2017, Paris, France, 5/21/17. https://doi.org/10.1109/ICCW.2017.7962672
Shattal MA, Al-Fuqaha A, Khan B, Dombrowski K, Wisniewska A. Evolution of bio-socially inspired strategies in support of dynamic spectrum access. In Papadias CB, Jamalipour A, editors, 2017 IEEE International Conference on Communications Workshops, ICC Workshops 2017. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc. 2017. p. 289-295. 7962672. (2017 IEEE International Conference on Communications Workshops, ICC Workshops 2017). https://doi.org/10.1109/ICCW.2017.7962672
Shattal, Mohammad Abu ; Al-Fuqaha, Ala ; Khan, Bilal ; Dombrowski, Kirk ; Wisniewska, Anna. / Evolution of bio-socially inspired strategies in support of dynamic spectrum access. 2017 IEEE International Conference on Communications Workshops, ICC Workshops 2017. editor / Constantinos B. Papadias ; Abbas Jamalipour. Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers Inc., 2017. pp. 289-295 (2017 IEEE International Conference on Communications Workshops, ICC Workshops 2017).
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