Evidence of an Epigenetics System in Archaea

Paul H Blum, Sophie Payne

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

Abstract

Changes in the phenotype of a cell or organism that are heritable but do not involve changes in DNA sequence are referred to as epigenetic. They occur primarily through the gain or loss of chemical modification of chromatin protein or DNA. Epigenetics is therefore a non-Mendelian process. The study of epigenetics in eukaryotes is expanding with advances in knowledge about the relationship between mechanism and phenotype and as a requirement for multicellularity and cancer. However, life also includes other groups or domains, notably the bacteria and archaea. The occurrence of epigenetics in these deep lineages is an emerging topic accompanied by controversy. In these non-eukaryotic organisms, epigenetics is critically important because it stimulates new evolutionary theory and refines perspective about biological action.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalEpigenetics Insights
Volume12
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2019

Fingerprint

DNA sequences
Archaea
Chemical modification
Epigenomics
Chromatin
Bacteria
DNA
Proteins
Phenotype
Eukaryota
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • Archaea
  • Epigenetics
  • Origin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Genetics

Cite this

Evidence of an Epigenetics System in Archaea. / Blum, Paul H; Payne, Sophie.

In: Epigenetics Insights, Vol. 12, 01.07.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalComment/debate

@article{7c1f4d6a6e1f4177bef0ecd836d02342,
title = "Evidence of an Epigenetics System in Archaea",
abstract = "Changes in the phenotype of a cell or organism that are heritable but do not involve changes in DNA sequence are referred to as epigenetic. They occur primarily through the gain or loss of chemical modification of chromatin protein or DNA. Epigenetics is therefore a non-Mendelian process. The study of epigenetics in eukaryotes is expanding with advances in knowledge about the relationship between mechanism and phenotype and as a requirement for multicellularity and cancer. However, life also includes other groups or domains, notably the bacteria and archaea. The occurrence of epigenetics in these deep lineages is an emerging topic accompanied by controversy. In these non-eukaryotic organisms, epigenetics is critically important because it stimulates new evolutionary theory and refines perspective about biological action.",
keywords = "Archaea, Epigenetics, Origin",
author = "Blum, {Paul H} and Sophie Payne",
year = "2019",
month = "7",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1177/2516865719865280",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "12",
journal = "Epigenetics Insights",
issn = "2516-8657",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Evidence of an Epigenetics System in Archaea

AU - Blum, Paul H

AU - Payne, Sophie

PY - 2019/7/1

Y1 - 2019/7/1

N2 - Changes in the phenotype of a cell or organism that are heritable but do not involve changes in DNA sequence are referred to as epigenetic. They occur primarily through the gain or loss of chemical modification of chromatin protein or DNA. Epigenetics is therefore a non-Mendelian process. The study of epigenetics in eukaryotes is expanding with advances in knowledge about the relationship between mechanism and phenotype and as a requirement for multicellularity and cancer. However, life also includes other groups or domains, notably the bacteria and archaea. The occurrence of epigenetics in these deep lineages is an emerging topic accompanied by controversy. In these non-eukaryotic organisms, epigenetics is critically important because it stimulates new evolutionary theory and refines perspective about biological action.

AB - Changes in the phenotype of a cell or organism that are heritable but do not involve changes in DNA sequence are referred to as epigenetic. They occur primarily through the gain or loss of chemical modification of chromatin protein or DNA. Epigenetics is therefore a non-Mendelian process. The study of epigenetics in eukaryotes is expanding with advances in knowledge about the relationship between mechanism and phenotype and as a requirement for multicellularity and cancer. However, life also includes other groups or domains, notably the bacteria and archaea. The occurrence of epigenetics in these deep lineages is an emerging topic accompanied by controversy. In these non-eukaryotic organisms, epigenetics is critically important because it stimulates new evolutionary theory and refines perspective about biological action.

KW - Archaea

KW - Epigenetics

KW - Origin

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85070087518&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85070087518&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/2516865719865280

DO - 10.1177/2516865719865280

M3 - Comment/debate

VL - 12

JO - Epigenetics Insights

JF - Epigenetics Insights

SN - 2516-8657

ER -