Evaluations of indoor Noise Criteria systems based on human response

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Abstract

The goal of this research is to examine human response to background noise, and relate results to indoor noise criteria. In an initial study by the authors, subjects completed perception surveys, typing tasks, and proofreading tasks under typical heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) noise conditions. Results were correlated with commonly used indoor noise criteria systems including Noise Criteria (NC), Room Criteria (RC) and others. The findings suggested that the types of tasks used and the length of exposure can impact the results. To examine these two issues, the authors conducted a second study in which each test subject completed 38 total hours of testing over multiple days. Subjects were exposed to several background noise exposures over 20, 40, 80, and 240 minute trials. During the trials, subjects completed a variety of performance tasks and answered questions about their perception of the noise, the thermal environment, and various other factors. Findings from this study are being used to determine optimum testing conditions for on-going research examining the effects of tonal or fluctuating background noise on performance, annoyance, and spectral perception. Results are being used to evaluate the effectiveness of commonly used indoor noise criteria systems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publication19th National Conference on Noise Control Engineering 2005, Noise-Con 05
Pages899-906
Number of pages8
StatePublished - Dec 1 2005
Event19th National Conference on Noise Control Engineering 2005, Noise-Con 2005 - Minneapolis, MN, United States
Duration: Oct 15 2005Oct 17 2005

Publication series

Name19th National Conference on Noise Control Engineering 2005, Noise-Con 05
Volume2

Conference

Conference19th National Conference on Noise Control Engineering 2005, Noise-Con 2005
CountryUnited States
CityMinneapolis, MN
Period10/15/0510/17/05

Fingerprint

evaluation
background noise
thermal environments
air conditioning
rooms
heating

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Acoustics and Ultrasonics

Cite this

Ryherd, E., & Wang, L. M. (2005). Evaluations of indoor Noise Criteria systems based on human response. In 19th National Conference on Noise Control Engineering 2005, Noise-Con 05 (pp. 899-906). (19th National Conference on Noise Control Engineering 2005, Noise-Con 05; Vol. 2).

Evaluations of indoor Noise Criteria systems based on human response. / Ryherd, Erica; Wang, Lily M.

19th National Conference on Noise Control Engineering 2005, Noise-Con 05. 2005. p. 899-906 (19th National Conference on Noise Control Engineering 2005, Noise-Con 05; Vol. 2).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contribution

Ryherd, E & Wang, LM 2005, Evaluations of indoor Noise Criteria systems based on human response. in 19th National Conference on Noise Control Engineering 2005, Noise-Con 05. 19th National Conference on Noise Control Engineering 2005, Noise-Con 05, vol. 2, pp. 899-906, 19th National Conference on Noise Control Engineering 2005, Noise-Con 2005, Minneapolis, MN, United States, 10/15/05.
Ryherd E, Wang LM. Evaluations of indoor Noise Criteria systems based on human response. In 19th National Conference on Noise Control Engineering 2005, Noise-Con 05. 2005. p. 899-906. (19th National Conference on Noise Control Engineering 2005, Noise-Con 05).
Ryherd, Erica ; Wang, Lily M. / Evaluations of indoor Noise Criteria systems based on human response. 19th National Conference on Noise Control Engineering 2005, Noise-Con 05. 2005. pp. 899-906 (19th National Conference on Noise Control Engineering 2005, Noise-Con 05).
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