Evaluation of different food safety education interventions

Yaohua Feng, Christine Bruhn, David B Marx

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose – The positive deviance (PD) focus group is a novel educational intervention that allows participants to discuss their food handling behaviors and decide to try recommended practices modeled by people like themselves. Currently, most food safety education is delivered through reading materials. The purpose of this paper is to explore the effectiveness of food safety education utilizing three interventions: PD, personal story reading and reading standard material. Design/methodology/approach – A total of 89 pregnant women and 93 people with diabetes received food safety information through one of three intervention methods: PD, reading standard educational material (Standard) and reading material presented in a story format (Story). A survey assessed self-reported risk and food safety knowledge and personal hygiene before and after the interventions. Take-home assignments allowed participants to practice recommendations. Post class interviews and survey assessed knowledge gained and reported behavior change. Findings – Compared to those who merely read educational information, participants in a PD Intervention had higher knowledge scores and adopted more safe handling recommendations. Involvement of the participants and the length of information exposure likely contributed to the significant difference between the interventions. This suggests that food safety education is most effective when delivered in a supportive discussion format. Health education programs for these vulnerable groups should endeavor to deliver safe food handling guidelines through a PD approach. Originality/value – Previous research demonstrated the effectiveness of PD when delivering nutrition education. This is the first paper that explored the effectiveness of a PD intervention in delivering safe handling recommendations.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)762-776
Number of pages15
JournalBritish Food Journal
Volume118
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 4 2016

Fingerprint

food safety education
Food Safety
Reading
Education
food handling
Food Handling
food safety
educational materials
health education
focus groups
nutrition education
behavior change
pregnant women
Focus Groups
education programs
Hygiene
hygiene
Health Education
diabetes
Pregnant Women

Keywords

  • Consumer
  • Evaluation
  • Food safety education
  • High-risk population
  • Positive deviance
  • Safe food handling

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science

Cite this

Evaluation of different food safety education interventions. / Feng, Yaohua; Bruhn, Christine; Marx, David B.

In: British Food Journal, Vol. 118, No. 4, 04.04.2016, p. 762-776.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Feng, Yaohua ; Bruhn, Christine ; Marx, David B. / Evaluation of different food safety education interventions. In: British Food Journal. 2016 ; Vol. 118, No. 4. pp. 762-776.
@article{b08f98f84aa746788653c7008c23eefa,
title = "Evaluation of different food safety education interventions",
abstract = "Purpose – The positive deviance (PD) focus group is a novel educational intervention that allows participants to discuss their food handling behaviors and decide to try recommended practices modeled by people like themselves. Currently, most food safety education is delivered through reading materials. The purpose of this paper is to explore the effectiveness of food safety education utilizing three interventions: PD, personal story reading and reading standard material. Design/methodology/approach – A total of 89 pregnant women and 93 people with diabetes received food safety information through one of three intervention methods: PD, reading standard educational material (Standard) and reading material presented in a story format (Story). A survey assessed self-reported risk and food safety knowledge and personal hygiene before and after the interventions. Take-home assignments allowed participants to practice recommendations. Post class interviews and survey assessed knowledge gained and reported behavior change. Findings – Compared to those who merely read educational information, participants in a PD Intervention had higher knowledge scores and adopted more safe handling recommendations. Involvement of the participants and the length of information exposure likely contributed to the significant difference between the interventions. This suggests that food safety education is most effective when delivered in a supportive discussion format. Health education programs for these vulnerable groups should endeavor to deliver safe food handling guidelines through a PD approach. Originality/value – Previous research demonstrated the effectiveness of PD when delivering nutrition education. This is the first paper that explored the effectiveness of a PD intervention in delivering safe handling recommendations.",
keywords = "Consumer, Evaluation, Food safety education, High-risk population, Positive deviance, Safe food handling",
author = "Yaohua Feng and Christine Bruhn and Marx, {David B}",
year = "2016",
month = "4",
day = "4",
doi = "10.1108/BFJ-10-2015-0372",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "118",
pages = "762--776",
journal = "British Food Journal",
issn = "0007-070X",
publisher = "Emerald Group Publishing Ltd.",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Evaluation of different food safety education interventions

AU - Feng, Yaohua

AU - Bruhn, Christine

AU - Marx, David B

PY - 2016/4/4

Y1 - 2016/4/4

N2 - Purpose – The positive deviance (PD) focus group is a novel educational intervention that allows participants to discuss their food handling behaviors and decide to try recommended practices modeled by people like themselves. Currently, most food safety education is delivered through reading materials. The purpose of this paper is to explore the effectiveness of food safety education utilizing three interventions: PD, personal story reading and reading standard material. Design/methodology/approach – A total of 89 pregnant women and 93 people with diabetes received food safety information through one of three intervention methods: PD, reading standard educational material (Standard) and reading material presented in a story format (Story). A survey assessed self-reported risk and food safety knowledge and personal hygiene before and after the interventions. Take-home assignments allowed participants to practice recommendations. Post class interviews and survey assessed knowledge gained and reported behavior change. Findings – Compared to those who merely read educational information, participants in a PD Intervention had higher knowledge scores and adopted more safe handling recommendations. Involvement of the participants and the length of information exposure likely contributed to the significant difference between the interventions. This suggests that food safety education is most effective when delivered in a supportive discussion format. Health education programs for these vulnerable groups should endeavor to deliver safe food handling guidelines through a PD approach. Originality/value – Previous research demonstrated the effectiveness of PD when delivering nutrition education. This is the first paper that explored the effectiveness of a PD intervention in delivering safe handling recommendations.

AB - Purpose – The positive deviance (PD) focus group is a novel educational intervention that allows participants to discuss their food handling behaviors and decide to try recommended practices modeled by people like themselves. Currently, most food safety education is delivered through reading materials. The purpose of this paper is to explore the effectiveness of food safety education utilizing three interventions: PD, personal story reading and reading standard material. Design/methodology/approach – A total of 89 pregnant women and 93 people with diabetes received food safety information through one of three intervention methods: PD, reading standard educational material (Standard) and reading material presented in a story format (Story). A survey assessed self-reported risk and food safety knowledge and personal hygiene before and after the interventions. Take-home assignments allowed participants to practice recommendations. Post class interviews and survey assessed knowledge gained and reported behavior change. Findings – Compared to those who merely read educational information, participants in a PD Intervention had higher knowledge scores and adopted more safe handling recommendations. Involvement of the participants and the length of information exposure likely contributed to the significant difference between the interventions. This suggests that food safety education is most effective when delivered in a supportive discussion format. Health education programs for these vulnerable groups should endeavor to deliver safe food handling guidelines through a PD approach. Originality/value – Previous research demonstrated the effectiveness of PD when delivering nutrition education. This is the first paper that explored the effectiveness of a PD intervention in delivering safe handling recommendations.

KW - Consumer

KW - Evaluation

KW - Food safety education

KW - High-risk population

KW - Positive deviance

KW - Safe food handling

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84961263076&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84961263076&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1108/BFJ-10-2015-0372

DO - 10.1108/BFJ-10-2015-0372

M3 - Article

VL - 118

SP - 762

EP - 776

JO - British Food Journal

JF - British Food Journal

SN - 0007-070X

IS - 4

ER -