Abstract

Providing computer-based laparoscopic surgical training has several advantages that enhance the training process. Self-evaluation and real-time performance feedback are 2 of these advantages, which avoid dependency of trainees on expert feedback. The goal of this study was to investigate the use of a visual time indicator as real-time feedback correlated with the laparoscopic surgical training. Twenty novices participated in this study working with (and without) different presentations of time indicators. They performed a standard peg transfer task, and their completion times and muscle activity were recorded and compared. Also of interest was whether the use of this type of feedback induced any side effect in terms of motivation or muscle fatigue. Results. Of the 20 participants, 15 (75%) preferred using a time indicator in the training process rather than having no feedback. However, time to task completion showed no significant difference in performance with the time indicator; furthermore, no significant differences in muscle activity or muscle fatigue were detected with/without time feedback. Conclusion. The absence of significant difference between task performance with/without time feedback shows that using visual real-time feedback can be included in surgical training based on user preference. Trainees may benefit from this type of feedback in the form of increased motivation. The extent to which this can influence training frequency leading to performance improvement is a question for further study.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)81-87
Number of pages7
JournalSurgical Innovation
Volume25
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2018

Fingerprint

Muscle Fatigue
Motivation
Muscles
Diagnostic Self Evaluation
Task Performance and Analysis
Dependency (Psychology)

Keywords

  • biomedical engineering
  • simulation
  • surgical education

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Evaluation of Augmented Reality Feedback in Surgical Training Environment. / Zahiri, Mohsen; Nelson, Carl A; Oleynikov, Dmitry; Siu, Joseph Ka-Chun.

In: Surgical Innovation, Vol. 25, No. 1, 01.02.2018, p. 81-87.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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