Evaluation of an interactive surveillance system for monitoring acute bacterial infections in Nigeria

Ashish Joshi, Chioma Amadi, Kate Trout, Stephen K Obaro

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study is to evaluate the usability of a stand-alone, Internet-enabled interactive surveillance system designed to monitor the burden of invasive bacterial infections among children in Nigeria.

METHOD: A convenience sample of 10 participants were enrolled in a training session on using the system at a hospital in Nigeria. The participants performed a series of tasks assessing their ability to use the system. System usability was assessed using a System Usability Scale (SUS) questionnaire.

RESULTS: The majority of participants found the system easy to use (90 percent; n = 9) and reported confidence in using the system. The average SUS score was 77.8. A total of 30 percent (n = 3) of the study participants had exceptional usability scores, 20 percent (n = 2) showed acceptable scores, and 10 percent (n = 1) had a good score.

CONCLUSION: Further evaluation of the system will help gauge additional challenges during its long-term utilization. If successful, the system could also be deployed in other resource poor-environments.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPerspectives in health information management / AHIMA, American Health Information Management Association
Volume11
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

Fingerprint

Nigeria
Bacterial Infections
Internet
Surveys and Questionnaires

Keywords

  • data capture
  • data collection
  • developing countries
  • health records storage
  • research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

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